Woe Quotes

588 Quotes: Sorted by Search Results (Descending)

About Woe Quotes

Keyword: Woe

Quotes: 588 total. 21 About.

Sorted by: Search Results (Descending)

Meta dataAverageRange
Words (count)644 - 618
Search Results6610 - 300
Date (year)1115-1900 - 2700
View Related Quotes

Bad Mood Quotes About 6 quotes

Broken-hearted Quotes About 22 quotes

Cheerless Quotes About 19 quotes

Crestfallen Quotes About 1 quotes

Dejected Quotes About 22 quotes

Depression Quotes About 175 quotes

Desolate Quotes About 267 quotes

Despair Quotes About 954 quotes

Despondent Quotes About 13 quotes

Disconsolate Quotes About 10 quotes

Dismal Quotes About 78 quotes

Doleful Quotes About 25 quotes

Dolorous Quotes About 4 quotes

Down And Out Quotes About 8 quotes

Downcast Quotes About 19 quotes

Downhearted Quotes About 2 quotes

Feel Down Quotes About 5 quotes

Feel Low Quotes About 6 quotes

Feel Sorry Quotes About 44 quotes

Forlorn Quotes About 83 quotes

Gloomy Quotes About 152 quotes

Glum Quotes About 13 quotes

Hapless Quotes About 35 quotes

Heartbroken Quotes About 12 quotes

Heartsick Quotes About 3 quotes

Inconsolable Quotes About 6 quotes

Melancholy Quotes About 274 quotes

Miserable Quotes About 494 quotes

Moody Quotes About 36 quotes

Mournful Quotes About 70 quotes

Regrettable Quotes About 35 quotes

Sad Quotes About 1020 quotes

Sadden Quotes About 5 quotes

Saddened Quotes About 41 quotes

Sadder Quotes About 34 quotes

Saddest Quotes About 49 quotes

Sadly Quotes About 177 quotes

Sadness Quotes About 191 quotes

Somber Quotes About 24 quotes

Sorrow Quotes About 1159 quotes

Sorry State Quotes About 3 quotes

Tragic Quotes About 452 quotes

Unhappy Quotes About 451 quotes

Unlucky Quotes About 58 quotes

Wretched Quotes About 324 quotes

Woe unto you, when all men shall speak well of you!
Speech
• Luke, VI. 26.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Speech" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 740-45.)
But woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye shut up the kingdom of heaven against men: for ye neither go in yourselves, neither suffer ye them that are entering to go in.
Matthew 23:13
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Gospel According to St. Matthew; Common Book Name: Matthew; Chapter: 23; Verse: 13.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Then said I, Woe is me! for I am undone; because I am a man of unclean lips, and I dwell in the midst of a people of unclean lips: for mine eyes have seen the King, the LORD of hosts.
Isaiah 6:5
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Isaiah; Common Book Name: Isaiah; Chapter: 6; Verse: 5.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
The second woe is past; and, behold, the third woe cometh quickly.
Revelation 11:14
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Revelation of St. John the Divine; Common Book Name: Revelation; Chapter: 11; Verse: 14.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe to those who call evil good and good evil, who put darkness for light and light for darkness, who put bitter for sweet and sweet for bitter!
Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye make clean the outside of the cup and of the platter, but within they are full of extortion and excess.
Matthew 23:25
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Gospel According to St. Matthew; Common Book Name: Matthew; Chapter: 23; Verse: 25.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
For though I preach the gospel, I have nothing to glory of: for necessity is laid upon me; yea, woe is unto me, if I preach not the gospel!
1 Corinthians 9:16
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The First Epistle of Paul the Apostle to the Corinthians; Common Book Name: 1 Corinthians; Chapter: 9; Verse: 16.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
For if they fall, the one will lift up his fellow: but woe to him that is alone when he falleth; for he hath not another to help him up.
Ecclesiastes 4:10
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: Ecclesiastes, or, The Preacher; Common Book Name: Ecclesiastes; Chapter: 4; Verse: 10.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye are like unto whited sepulchres, which indeed appear beautiful outward, but are within full of dead men's bones, and of all uncleanness.
Matthew 23:27
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Gospel According to St. Matthew; Common Book Name: Matthew; Chapter: 23; Verse: 27.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye compass sea and land to make one proselyte, and when he is made, ye make him twofold more the child of hell than yourselves.
Matthew 23:15
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Gospel According to St. Matthew; Common Book Name: Matthew; Chapter: 23; Verse: 15.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe unto them that are wise in their own eyes, and prudent in their own sight!
Isaiah 5:21
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Isaiah; Common Book Name: Isaiah; Chapter: 5; Verse: 21.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe be unto the pastors that destroy and scatter the sheep of my pasture! saith the LORD.
Jeremiah 23:1
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Jeremiah; Common Book Name: Jeremiah; Chapter: 23; Verse: 1.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
And woe unto them that are with child, and to them that give suck in those days!
Matthew 24:19
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Gospel According to St. Matthew; Common Book Name: Matthew; Chapter: 24; Verse: 19.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! because ye build the tombs of the prophets, and garnish the sepulchres of the righteous,
Matthew 23:29
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Gospel According to St. Matthew; Common Book Name: Matthew; Chapter: 23; Verse: 29.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe unto the world because of offences! for it must needs be that offences come; but woe to that man by whom the offence cometh!
Matthew 18:7
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Gospel According to St. Matthew; Common Book Name: Matthew; Chapter: 18; Verse: 7.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye devour widows' houses, and for a pretence make long prayer: therefore ye shall receive the greater damnation.
Matthew 23:14
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Gospel According to St. Matthew; Common Book Name: Matthew; Chapter: 23; Verse: 14.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Prayer is the pillar of your religion and one who intentionally forsakes his prayer has destroyed his religion. And one who does not guard the times of the prayers, shall be made to enter ‘Wayl’, which is a valley in Hell, as Allah, the Exalted, has said: "So woe to the praying ones, who are unmindful of their prayers."
Let us imagine that the aboriginal-original human specimen was one of two brother apes, A and B; they were alike in every respect; both were animal space-binders; but something strange happened to B; he became the first time-binder, a human. … He had thus a new faculty, he belonged to a new dimension; but, of course, he did not realize it; and because he had this new capacity he was able to analyze his brother "A"; he observed "A is my brother; he is an animal; but he is my brother; therefore, I AM AN ANIMAL." This fatal first conclusion, reached by false analogy, by neglecting a fact, has been the chief source of human woe for half a million years and it still survives. … He [then] said to himself, "If I am an animal there is also in me something higher, a spark of some thing supernatural."
Woe unto you, when all men shall speak well of you! for so did their fathers to the false prophets.
Luke 6:26
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Gospel According to St. Luke; Common Book Name: Luke; Chapter: 6; Verse: 26.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe unto you that desire the day of the LORD! to what end is it for you? the day of the LORD is darkness, and not light.
Amos 5:18
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: Amos; Common Book Name: Amos; Chapter: 5; Verse: 18.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
"Enlarge my life with multitude of days!" In health, in sickness, thus the suppliant prays: Hides from himself his state, and shuns to know That life protracted is protracted woe.
"Enlarge my life with multitude of days!" In health, in sickness, thus the suppliant prays: Hides from himself its state, and shuns to know, That life protracted is protracted woe.
Life
• Samuel Johnson, Vanity of Human Wishes, line 255.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Life" (Anonymous, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 440-55.)
Woe unto thee, Chorazin! woe unto thee, Bethsaida! for if the mighty works, which were done in you, had been done in Tyre and Sidon, they would have repented long ago in sackcloth and ashes.
Matthew 11:21
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Gospel According to St. Matthew; Common Book Name: Matthew; Chapter: 11; Verse: 21.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe to the idol shepherd that leaveth the flock! the sword shall be upon his arm, and upon his right eye: his arm shall be clean dried up, and his right eye shall be utterly darkened.
Zechariah 11:17
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: Zechariah; Common Book Name: Zechariah; Chapter: 11; Verse: 17.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Therefore rejoice, ye heavens, and ye that dwell in them. Woe to the inhabiters of the earth and of the sea! for the devil is come down unto you, having great wrath, because he knoweth that he hath but a short time.
Revelation 12:12
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Revelation of St. John the Divine; Common Book Name: Revelation; Chapter: 12; Verse: 12.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Thou, silent form, dost tease us out of thought As doth eternity: Cold Pastoral! When old age shall this generation waste, Thou shalt remain, in midst of other woe Than ours, a friend to man, to whom thou say'st, "Beauty is truth, truth beauty," — that is all Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know.
John Keats
• Stanza 5. The final lines of this poem have been rendered in various ways in different editions, some placing the entire last two lines within quotation marks, others only the statement "Beauty is truth, truth beauty," and others without any quotation marks. The poet's final intentions upon the matter before his death are unclear.
• Source: Wikiquote: "John Keats" (Sourced, Poems (1820), Ode on a Grecian Urn: Written in May 1819 - Full text online)
Woe to him who in passing should hurl an insult at this gentle and pensive head. He would be punished, as all vulgar souls are punished, by his very vulgarity, and by his incapacity to conceive what is divine. This man, from his granite pedestal, will point out to all men the way of blessedness which he found; and ages hence, the cultivated traveler, passing by this spot, will say in his heart, "The truest vision ever had of God came, perhaps, here."
Woe unto them that call evil good, and good evil; that put darkness for light, and light for darkness; that put bitter for sweet, and sweet for bitter!
Isaiah 5:20
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Isaiah; Common Book Name: Isaiah; Chapter: 5; Verse: 20.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
The shew of their countenance doth witness against them; and they declare their sin as Sodom, they hide it not. Woe unto their soul! for they have rewarded evil unto themselves.
Isaiah 3:9
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Isaiah; Common Book Name: Isaiah; Chapter: 3; Verse: 9.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye pay tithe of mint and anise and cummin, and have omitted the weightier matters of the law, judgment, mercy, and faith: these ought ye to have done, and not to leave the other undone.
Matthew 23:23
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Gospel According to St. Matthew; Common Book Name: Matthew; Chapter: 23; Verse: 23.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
"Woe unto you when all men shall speak well of you!"
One woe is past; and, behold, there come two woes more hereafter.
Revelation 9:12
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Revelation of St. John the Divine; Common Book Name: Revelation; Chapter: 9; Verse: 12.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
But woe unto you that are rich! for ye have received your consolation.
Luke 6:24
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Gospel According to St. Luke; Common Book Name: Luke; Chapter: 6; Verse: 24.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe unto you, lawyers! for ye have taken away the key of knowledge: ye entered not in yourselves, and them that were entering in ye hindered.
The Son of man goeth as it is written of him: but woe unto that man by whom the Son of man is betrayed! it had been good for that man if he had not been born.
Matthew 26:24
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Gospel According to St. Matthew; Common Book Name: Matthew; Chapter: 26; Verse: 24.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Two are better than one; because they have a good reward for their labour. For if they fall, the one will lift up his fellow: but woe to him that is alone when he falleth; for he hath not another to help him up."
And I beheld, and heard an angel flying through the midst of heaven, saying with a loud voice, Woe, woe, woe, to the inhabiters of the earth by reason of the other voices of the trumpet of the three angels, which are yet to sound!
Revelation 8:13
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Revelation of St. John the Divine; Common Book Name: Revelation; Chapter: 8; Verse: 13.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe unto them that call evil good, and good evil.
Evil
• Isaiah. V. 20.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Evil" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 239-41.)
Woe unto them! for they have gone in the way of Cain, and ran greedily after the error of Balaam for reward, and perished in the gainsaying of Core.
Jude 1:11
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The General Epistle of Jude; Common Book Name: Jude; Chapter: 1; Verse: 11.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
But woe unto them that are with child, and to them that give suck, in those days! for there shall be great distress in the land, and wrath upon this people.
Luke 21:23
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Gospel According to St. Luke; Common Book Name: Luke; Chapter: 21; Verse: 23.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe unto him that striveth with his Maker! Let the potsherd strive with the potsherds of the earth. Shall the clay say to him that fashioneth it, What makest thou? or thy work, He hath no hands?
Isaiah 45:9
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Isaiah; Common Book Name: Isaiah; Chapter: 45; Verse: 9.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Son of man, prophesy against the shepherds of Israel, prophesy, and say unto them, Thus saith the Lord GOD unto the shepherds; Woe be to the shepherds of Israel that do feed themselves! should not the shepherds feed the flocks?
Ezekiel 34:2
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Ezekiel; Common Book Name: Ezekiel; Chapter: 34; Verse: 2.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
'Tis writ on Paradise's gate, "Woe to the dupe that yields to Fate!"
Fate
• Mohammed Shems-ed-Deen Hafiz.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Fate" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 261-65.)
Woe unto you that are full! for ye shall hunger. Woe unto you that laugh now! for ye shall mourn and weep.
Luke 6:25
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Gospel According to St. Luke; Common Book Name: Luke; Chapter: 6; Verse: 25.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Thus to the Lord doth Asha, the Truth, reply: "No guide is known who can shelter the world from woe, None who knows what moves and works Thy lofty plans."
Zoroaster
• Ahunuvaiti Gatha; Yasna 29, 3.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Zoroaster" (Quotes, The Gathas: Translation by Dinshaw Jamshedji Irani, in K. D. Irani, Rabindranath Tagore, The Gathas: the Hymns of Zarathushtra, K.R. Cama Oriental Institute, 1999, 96 p. at Zarathustra.com.)
Woe unto them that seek deep to hide their counsel from the LORD, and their works are in the dark, and they say, Who seeth us? and who knoweth us?
Isaiah 29:15
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Isaiah; Common Book Name: Isaiah; Chapter: 29; Verse: 15.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
But woe unto you, Pharisees! for ye tithe mint and rue and all manner of herbs, and pass over judgment and the love of God: these ought ye to have done, and not to leave the other undone.
Luke 11:42
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Gospel According to St. Luke; Common Book Name: Luke; Chapter: 11; Verse: 42.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe unto them that are mighty to drink wine, and men of strength to mingle strong drink:
Isaiah 5:22
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Isaiah; Common Book Name: Isaiah; Chapter: 5; Verse: 22.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Thus saith the Lord GOD; Woe unto the foolish prophets, that follow their own spirit, and have seen nothing!
Ezekiel 13:3
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Ezekiel; Common Book Name: Ezekiel; Chapter: 13; Verse: 3.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Who hath woe? who hath sorrow? who hath contentions? who hath babbling? who hath wounds without cause? who hath redness of eyes?
Proverbs 23:29
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Proverbs; Common Book Name: Proverbs; Chapter: 23; Verse: 29.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Of Man's first disobedience, and the fruit Of that forbidden tree whose mortal taste Brought death into the world, and all our woe, With loss of Eden, till one greater Man Restore us, and regain the blissful Seat,
Of Man's first disobedience, and the fruit Of that forbidden tree whose mortal taste Brought death into the world, and all our woe, With loss of Eden, till one greater Man Restore us, and regain the blissful Seat
Many forms of Government have been tried and will be tried in this world of sin and woe. No one pretends that democracy is perfect or all-wise. Indeed, it has been said that democracy is the worst form of government except all those other forms that have been tried from time to time.
Many forms of Government have been tried, and will be tried in this world of sin and woe. No one pretends that democracy is perfect or all-wise. Indeed, it has been said that democracy is the worst form of government except all those other forms that have been tried from time to time.
Politics
• Winston Churchill, speech in the House of Commons: The Official Report, House of Commons (5th Series), 11 November 1947, vol. 444, cc. 206–07.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Politics" (Democracy)
Woe to the land shadowing with wings, which is beyond the rivers of Ethiopia:
Isaiah 18:1
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Isaiah; Common Book Name: Isaiah; Chapter: 18; Verse: 1.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
But woe to them that are with child, and to them that give suck in those days!
Mark 13:17
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Gospel According to St. Mark; Common Book Name: Mark; Chapter: 13; Verse: 17.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe unto them that draw iniquity with cords of vanity, and sin as it were with a cart rope:
Isaiah 5:18
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Isaiah; Common Book Name: Isaiah; Chapter: 5; Verse: 18.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe unto the wicked! it shall be ill with him: for the reward of his hands shall be given him.
Isaiah 3:11
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Isaiah; Common Book Name: Isaiah; Chapter: 3; Verse: 11.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
And truly the Son of man goeth, as it was determined: but woe unto that man by whom he is betrayed!
Luke 22:22
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Gospel According to St. Luke; Common Book Name: Luke; Chapter: 22; Verse: 22.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Can I see another's woe, And not be in sorrow too? Can I see another's grief, And not seek for kind relief?
Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye are as graves which appear not, and the men that walk over them are not aware of them.
Luke 11:44
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Gospel According to St. Luke; Common Book Name: Luke; Chapter: 11; Verse: 44.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe to the rebellious children, saith the LORD, that take counsel, but not of me; and that cover with a covering, but not of my spirit, that they may add sin to sin:
Isaiah 30:1
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Isaiah; Common Book Name: Isaiah; Chapter: 30; Verse: 1.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
"...when I made that first record my life was in the 'shitter' you know and everything sucked. I am sick and tired of being miserable all the time and I’m sick and tired of being sick and tired all the time... I can say that I have kind of consciously moved away from this whole 'woe is me' mentality because my head is not there anymore."
The sweetest joy, the wildest woe is love.
O, woe is me To have seen what I have seen, see what I see!
Woe unto you! for ye build the sepulchres of the prophets, and your fathers killed them.
Luke 11:47
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Gospel According to St. Luke; Common Book Name: Luke; Chapter: 11; Verse: 47.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Then said he unto the disciples, It is impossible but that offences will come: but woe unto him, through whom they come!
Luke 17:1
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Gospel According to St. Luke; Common Book Name: Luke; Chapter: 17; Verse: 1.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe unto them that join house to house, that lay field to field, till there be no place, that they may be placed alone in the midst of the earth!
Isaiah 5:8
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Isaiah; Common Book Name: Isaiah; Chapter: 5; Verse: 8.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe unto you, ye blind guides, which say, Whosoever shall swear by the temple, it is nothing; but whosoever shall swear by the gold of the temple, he is a debtor!
Matthew 23:16
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Gospel According to St. Matthew; Common Book Name: Matthew; Chapter: 23; Verse: 16.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe to the crown of pride, to the drunkards of Ephraim, whose glorious beauty is a fading flower, which are on the head of the fat valleys of them that are overcome with wine!
Isaiah 28:1
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Isaiah; Common Book Name: Isaiah; Chapter: 28; Verse: 1.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe to them that go down to Egypt for help; and stay on horses, and trust in chariots, because they are many; and in horsemen, because they are very strong; but they look not unto the Holy One of Israel, neither seek the LORD!
Isaiah 31:1
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Isaiah; Common Book Name: Isaiah; Chapter: 31; Verse: 1.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe is me, that I sojourn in Mesech, that I dwell in the tents of Kedar!
Psalms 120:5
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of Psalms; Common Book Name: Psalms; Chapter: 120; Verse: 5.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe unto them that rise up early in the morning, that they may follow strong drink; that continue until night, till wine inflame them!
Isaiah 5:11
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Isaiah; Common Book Name: Isaiah; Chapter: 5; Verse: 11.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
"Take that stupid grin off your face," he said. "You're putting me off." "Sorry." I adopted a hideous expression of malady and woe. "That's not much better."
And he said, Woe unto you also, ye lawyers! for ye lade men with burdens grievous to be borne, and ye yourselves touch not the burdens with one of your fingers.
Luke 11:46
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Gospel According to St. Luke; Common Book Name: Luke; Chapter: 11; Verse: 46.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
The Son of man indeed goeth, as it is written of him: but woe to that man by whom the Son of man is betrayed! good were it for that man if he had never been born.
Mark 14:21
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Gospel According to St. Mark; Common Book Name: Mark; Chapter: 14; Verse: 21.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
With what a deep devotedness of woe I wept thy absence—o'er and o'er again Thinking of thee, still thee, till thought grew pain, And memory, like a drop that, night and day, Falls cold and ceaseless, wore my heart away!
Woe unto them that call evil good, and good evil; that put darkness for light, and light for darkness; that put bitter for sweet, and sweet for bitter! Woe unto them that are wise in their own eyes, and prudent in their own sight!
And say, Thus saith the Lord GOD; Woe to the women that sew pillows to all armholes, and make kerchiefs upon the head of every stature to hunt souls! Will ye hunt the souls of my people, and will ye save the souls alive that come unto you?
Ezekiel 13:18
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Ezekiel; Common Book Name: Ezekiel; Chapter: 13; Verse: 18.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe unto him that saith unto his father, What begettest thou? or to the woman, What hast thou brought forth?
Isaiah 45:10
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Isaiah; Common Book Name: Isaiah; Chapter: 45; Verse: 10.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe unto him that giveth his neighbour drink, that puttest thy bottle to him, and makest him drunken also, that thou mayest look on their nakedness!
Habakkuk 2:15
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: Habakkuk; Common Book Name: Habakkuk; Chapter: 2; Verse: 15.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Behold, he shall come up as clouds, and his chariots shall be as a whirlwind: his horses are swifter than eagles. Woe unto us! for we are spoiled.
Jeremiah 4:13
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Jeremiah; Common Book Name: Jeremiah; Chapter: 4; Verse: 13.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
A glooming peace this morning with it brings; The sun for sorrow will not show his head. Go hence, to have more talk of these sad things; Some shall be pardon'd, and some punished: For never was a story of more woe Than this of Juliet and her Romeo.
An Iliad of woes.
Woe
• Demosthenes, 387. 12. Diodorus Siculus. Used in Thomas De Quincey, Confessions of an Opium Eater, Part II.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Woe" (Sourced, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 886.)
One woe doth tread upon another's heel So fast they follow.
Woe
• William Shakespeare, Hamlet (1600-02), Act IV, scene 7, line 165.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Woe" (Sourced, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 886.)
All these woes shall serve For sweet discourses in our time to come.
Woe
• William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet (1597), Act III, scene 5, line 52.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Woe" (Sourced, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 886.)
Woe unto them that decree unrighteous decrees, and that write grievousness which they have prescribed;
Isaiah 10:1
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Isaiah; Common Book Name: Isaiah; Chapter: 10; Verse: 1.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe unto you, Pharisees! for ye love the uppermost seats in the synagogues, and greetings in the markets.
Luke 11:43
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Gospel According to St. Luke; Common Book Name: Luke; Chapter: 11; Verse: 43.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe to the multitude of many people, which make a noise like the noise of the seas; and to the rushing of nations, that make a rushing like the rushing of mighty waters!
Isaiah 17:12
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Isaiah; Common Book Name: Isaiah; Chapter: 17; Verse: 12.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe unto him that saith to the wood, Awake; to the dumb stone, Arise, it shall teach! Behold, it is laid over with gold and silver, and there is no breath at all in the midst of it.
Habakkuk 2:19
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: Habakkuk; Common Book Name: Habakkuk; Chapter: 2; Verse: 19.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe unto thee, Chorazin! woe unto thee, Bethsaida! for if the mighty works had been done in Tyre and Sidon, which have been done in you, they had a great while ago repented, sitting in sackcloth and ashes.
Luke 10:13
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Gospel According to St. Luke; Common Book Name: Luke; Chapter: 10; Verse: 13.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
As for me, I have not hastened from being a pastor to follow thee: neither have I desired the woeful day; thou knowest: that which came out of my lips was right before thee.
Jeremiah 17:16
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Jeremiah; Common Book Name: Jeremiah; Chapter: 17; Verse: 16.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe unto the inhabitants of the sea coast, the nation of the Cherethites! the word of the LORD is against you; O Canaan, the land of the Philistines, I will even destroy thee, that there shall be no inhabitant.
Zephaniah 2:5
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: Zephaniah; Common Book Name: Zephaniah; Chapter: 2; Verse: 5.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe to him that buildeth a town with blood, and stablisheth a city by iniquity!
Habakkuk 2:12
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: Habakkuk; Common Book Name: Habakkuk; Chapter: 2; Verse: 12.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe to thee, O land, when thy king is a child, and thy princes eat in the morning!
Ecclesiastes 10:16
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: Ecclesiastes, or, The Preacher; Common Book Name: Ecclesiastes; Chapter: 10; Verse: 16.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe to Ariel, to Ariel, the city where David dwelt! add ye year to year; let them kill sacrifices.
Isaiah 29:1
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Isaiah; Common Book Name: Isaiah; Chapter: 29; Verse: 1.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe to the man whose heart has not learned while young to hope, to love — and to put its trust in life!!
Woe to him that coveteth an evil covetousness to his house, that he may set his nest on high, that he may be delivered from the power of evil!
Habakkuk 2:9
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: Habakkuk; Common Book Name: Habakkuk; Chapter: 2; Verse: 9.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
From the uttermost part of the earth have we heard songs, even glory to the righteous. But I said, My leanness, my leanness, woe unto me! the treacherous dealers have dealt treacherously; yea, the treacherous dealers have dealt very treacherously.
Isaiah 24:16
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Isaiah; Common Book Name: Isaiah; Chapter: 24; Verse: 16.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth, That I am meek and gentle with these butchers! Thou art the ruins of the noblest man That ever lived in the tide of times. Woe to the hand that shed this costly blood Over thy wounds now do I prophesy.
Homicide
Julius Caesar, Act III, scene 1, line 254.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Homicide" (Quotes, Quotes by William Shakespeare: Many of Shakespeare's plays include or even center on a homicide.)
For I have heard a voice as of a woman in travail, and the anguish as of her that bringeth forth her first child, the voice of the daughter of Zion, that bewaileth herself, that spreadeth her hands, saying, Woe is me now! for my soul is wearied because of murderers.
Jeremiah 4:31
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Jeremiah; Common Book Name: Jeremiah; Chapter: 4; Verse: 31.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Willful waste makes woeful want.
Woe is me for my hurt! my wound is grievous: but I said, Truly this is a grief, and I must bear it.
Jeremiah 10:19
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Jeremiah; Common Book Name: Jeremiah; Chapter: 10; Verse: 19.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Such was the wreck of the Hesperus, In the midnight and the snow! Christ save us all from a death like this, On the reef of Norman's Woe!
Woe to thee, Moab! thou art undone, O people of Chemosh: he hath given his sons that escaped, and his daughters, into captivity unto Sihon king of the Amorites.
Numbers 21:29
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Fourth Book of Moses, called Numbers; Common Book Name: Numbers; Chapter: 21; Verse: 29.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe unto us! who shall deliver us out of the hand of these mighty Gods? these are the Gods that smote the Egyptians with all the plagues in the wilderness.
1 Samuel 4:8
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The First Book of Samuel, otherwise called the First Book of the Kings; Common Book Name: 1 Samuel; Chapter: 4; Verse: 8.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe unto them! for they have fled from me: destruction unto them! because they have transgressed against me: though I have redeemed them, yet they have spoken lies against me.
Hosea 7:13
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: Hosea; Common Book Name: Hosea; Chapter: 7; Verse: 13.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
And I had done an hellish thing, And it would work 'em woe: For all averred, I had killed the bird That made the breeze to blow. Ah wretch! said they, the bird to slay, That made the breeze to blow!
''Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more, Men were deceivers ever; One foot in sea, and one on shore, To one thing constant never. Then sigh not so, But let them go, And be you blithe and bonny, Converting all your sounds of woe Into Hey nonny, nonny.
He that dippeth his hand with me in the dish, the same shall betray me. The Son of man goeth as it is written of him: but woe unto that man by whom the Son of man is betrayed! it had been good for that man if he had not been born.
Lost, lost! one moment knelled the woe of years.
Thou source of all my bliss, and all my woe, That found'st me poor at first, and keep'st me so.
Thou source of all my bliss and all my woe, That found'st me poor at first, and keep'st me so.
Poverty
• Oliver Goldsmith, The Deserted Village (1770), line 413.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Poverty" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 620-22.)
And he spread it before me; and it was written within and without: and there was written therein lamentations, and mourning, and woe.
Ezekiel 2:10
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Ezekiel; Common Book Name: Ezekiel; Chapter: 2; Verse: 10.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
And the Philistines were afraid, for they said, God is come into the camp. And they said, Woe unto us! for there hath not been such a thing heretofore.
1 Samuel 4:7
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The First Book of Samuel, otherwise called the First Book of the Kings; Common Book Name: 1 Samuel; Chapter: 4; Verse: 7.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Though they bring up their children, yet will I bereave them, that there shall not be a man left: yea, woe also to them when I depart from them!
Hosea 9:12
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: Hosea; Common Book Name: Hosea; Chapter: 9; Verse: 12.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe to them that are at ease in Zion, and trust in the mountain of Samaria, which are named chief of the nations, to whom the house of Israel came!
Amos 6:1
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: Amos; Common Book Name: Amos; Chapter: 6; Verse: 1.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Shall not all these take up a parable against him, and a taunting proverb against him, and say, Woe to him that increaseth that which is not his! how long? and to him that ladeth himself with thick clay!
Habakkuk 2:6
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: Habakkuk; Common Book Name: Habakkuk; Chapter: 2; Verse: 6.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Through torrid tracts with fainting steps they go, Where wild Altama murmurs to their woe.
Woe to the bloody city! it is all full of lies and robbery; the prey departeth not;
Nahum 3:1
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: Nahum; Common Book Name: Nahum; Chapter: 3; Verse: 1.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe is me, my mother, that thou hast borne me a man of strife and a man of contention to the whole earth! I have neither lent on usury, nor men have lent to me on usury; yet every one of them doth curse me.
Jeremiah 15:10
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Jeremiah; Common Book Name: Jeremiah; Chapter: 15; Verse: 10.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe to thee that spoilest, and thou wast not spoiled; and dealest treacherously, and they dealt not treacherously with thee! when thou shalt cease to spoil, thou shalt be spoiled; and when thou shalt make an end to deal treacherously, they shall deal treacherously with thee.
Isaiah 33:1
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Isaiah; Common Book Name: Isaiah; Chapter: 33; Verse: 1.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Riches cover a multitude of woes.
Woe to her that is filthy and polluted, to the oppressing city!
Zephaniah 3:1
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: Zephaniah; Common Book Name: Zephaniah; Chapter: 3; Verse: 1.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Slay all her bullocks; let them go down to the slaughter: woe unto them! for their day is come, the time of their visitation.
Jeremiah 50:27
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Jeremiah; Common Book Name: Jeremiah; Chapter: 50; Verse: 27.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Thou didst say, Woe is me now! for the LORD hath added grief to my sorrow; I fainted in my sighing, and I find no rest.
Jeremiah 45:3
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Jeremiah; Common Book Name: Jeremiah; Chapter: 45; Verse: 3.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe is me! for I am as when they have gathered the summer fruits, as the grapegleanings of the vintage: there is no cluster to eat: my soul desired the firstripe fruit.
Micah 7:1
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: Micah; Common Book Name: Micah; Chapter: 7; Verse: 1.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
I have seen thine adulteries, and thy neighings, the lewdness of thy whoredom, and thine abominations on the hills in the fields. Woe unto thee, O Jerusalem! wilt thou not be made clean? when shall it once be?
Jeremiah 13:27
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Jeremiah; Common Book Name: Jeremiah; Chapter: 13; Verse: 27.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Wherefore thus saith the Lord GOD; Woe to the bloody city, to the pot whose scum is therein, and whose scum is not gone out of it! bring it out piece by piece; let no lot fall upon it.
Ezekiel 24:6
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Ezekiel; Common Book Name: Ezekiel; Chapter: 24; Verse: 6.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Long exercised in woes.
Woe
• Homer, The Odyssey, Book I, line 2. Pope's translation.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Woe" (Sourced, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 886.)
The soft complaining flute, In dying notes, discovers The woes of hopeless lovers.
Soon as thy letters trembling I unclose, That well-known name awakens all my woes.
Ah, woe is me! Winter is come and gone, But grief returns with the revolving year.
Son of man, prophesy and say, Thus saith the Lord GOD; Howl ye, Woe worth the day!
Ezekiel 30:2
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Ezekiel; Common Book Name: Ezekiel; Chapter: 30; Verse: 2.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Man was made for joy and woe, And when this we rightly know Through the world we safely go.
Therefore thus saith the Lord GOD; Woe to the bloody city! I will even make the pile for fire great.
Ezekiel 24:9
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Ezekiel; Common Book Name: Ezekiel; Chapter: 24; Verse: 9.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
His wretchedness, and his resistance, And his sad unallied existence: To which his spirit may oppose Itself—and equal to all woes.
Woe unto him that buildeth his house by unrighteousness, and his chambers by wrong; that useth his neighbour's service without wages, and giveth him not for his work;
Jeremiah 22:13
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Jeremiah; Common Book Name: Jeremiah; Chapter: 22; Verse: 13.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Against Moab thus saith the LORD of hosts, the God of Israel; Woe unto Nebo! for it is spoiled: Kiriathaim is confounded and taken: Misgab is confounded and dismayed.
Jeremiah 48:1
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Jeremiah; Common Book Name: Jeremiah; Chapter: 48; Verse: 1.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
The Son of God goes forth to war, A kingly crown to gain; His blood red banner streams afar: Who follows in His train? Who best can drink his cup of woe, Triumphant over pain, Who patient bears his cross below, He follows in His train.
The man for wisdom's various arts renown'd Long exercised in woes, O Muse! resound.
The crown is fallen from our head: woe unto us, that we have sinned!
Lamentations 5:16
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Lamentations of Jeremiah; Common Book Name: Lamentations; Chapter: 5; Verse: 16.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
The only medicine for suffering, crime, and all the other woes of mankind, is wisdom.
Woe, destruction, ruin, and decay; The worst is death, and death will have his day.
And it came to pass after all thy wickedness, (woe, woe unto thee! saith the Lord GOD;)
Ezekiel 16:23
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Ezekiel; Common Book Name: Ezekiel; Chapter: 16; Verse: 23.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Prepare ye war against her; arise, and let us go up at noon. Woe unto us! for the day goeth away, for the shadows of the evening are stretched out.
Jeremiah 6:4
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Jeremiah; Common Book Name: Jeremiah; Chapter: 6; Verse: 4.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
In America the majority raises formidable barriers around the liberty of opinion; within these barriers an author may write what he pleases, but woe to him if he goes beyond them.
What is the worst of woes that wait on age? What stamps the wrinkle deeper on the brow? To view each loved one blotted from life's page, And be alone on earth, as I am now.
What is the worst of woes that wait on age? What stamps the wrinkle deeper on the brow? To view each loved one blotted from life's page, And be alone on earth as I am now.
Age
• Lord Byron, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto II (1812), Stanza 98.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Age" (Sourced, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 12-17.)
'''"Remember this son, if you forget everything else: A poet is a musician who can't sing. Words have to find a man's mind before they can touch his heart. And, some men's minds are woeful small targets. Music touches their hearts directly, no matter how small or stubborn the mind of the man who listens.”
Rejoice, and men will seek you; Grieve, and they turn and go. They want full measure of all your pleasure, But they do not need your woe. Be glad, and your friends are many; Be sad, and you lose them all. There are none to decline your nectared wine, But alone you must drink life's gall.
When one with honeyed words but evil mind Persuades the mob, great woes befall the state.
Woe to the thinker who is not the gardener but only the soil of the plants that grow in him!
As long as skies are blue, and fields are green, Evening must usher night, night urge the morrow, Month follow month with woe, and year wake year to sorrow.
I feel The link of nature draw me: flesh of flesh, Bone of my bone thou art, and from thy state Mine never shall be parted, bliss or woe.
"You leave me without hope," Brys said. "I am sorry for that. Do not seek to find hope among your leaders. They are the repositories of poison. Their interest in you extends only so far as their ability to control you. For you, they seek duty and obedience, and they will ply you with the language of stirring faith. They seek followers, and woe to those who question, or voice challenge."
Lord of himself,—that heritage of woe!
Lord of himself;—that heritage of woe!
Man
• Lord Byron, Lara, A Tale (1814), Canto I, Stanza 2
• Source: Wikiquote: "Man" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 487-93.)
The house of laughter makes a house of woe.
I learn to pity woes so like my own.
And bear about the mockery of woe To midnight dances and the public show.
Thou hast a voice, great Mountain, to repeal Large codes of fraud and woe.
Mountains
• Percy Bysshe Shelley "Lines Written in the Vale of Chamouni" (1817), line 80.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Mountains" (Quotes: Sorted alphabetically by author or source)
Yet, taught by time, my heart has learned to glow For other's good, and melt at other's woe.
Sympathy
• Homer, The Odyssey, Book XVIII, line 269. Pope's translation.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Sympathy" (Sourced, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 775-76.)
Though those that are betray'd Do feel the treason sharply, yet the traitor Stands in worse case of woe.
The soft complaining flute In dying notes discovers The woes of hopeless lovers, Whose dirge is whisper'd by the warbling lute.
Music
• John Dryden, A Song for St. Cecilia's Day.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Music" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 535-41.)
No doubt the artist is the child of his time; but woe to him if he is also its disciple, or even its favorite.
I cannot love as I have loved, And yet I know not why; It is the one great woe of life To feel all feeling die.
Let the credulous and the vulgar continue to believe that all mental woes can be cured by a daily application of old Greek myths to their private parts.
Woe to them that devise iniquity, and work evil upon their beds! when the morning is light, they practice it, because it is in the power of their hand.
Micah 2:1
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: Micah; Common Book Name: Micah; Chapter: 2; Verse: 1.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
If I be wicked, woe unto me; and if I be righteous, yet will I not lift up my head. I am full of confusion; therefore see thou mine affliction;
Job 10:15
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of Job; Common Book Name: Job; Chapter: 10; Verse: 15.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
Woe to that nation whose literature is cut short by the intrusion of force. This is not merely interference with freedom of the press but the sealing up of a nation's heart, the excision of its memory.
Freedom of the press
• Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Nobel lecture prepared for the Swedish Academy, not actually delivered as an address (1970), variant translation, as quoted in TIME (25 February 1974). Another translations is "Woe to that nation whose literature is disturbed by the intervention of power. Because that is not just a violation against "freedom of print", it is the closing down of the heart of the nation, a slashing to pieces of its memory".
• Source: Wikiquote: "Freedom of the press" (Quotes)
Alas! that all we loved of him should be, But for our grief, as if it had not been, And grief itself be mortal! Woe is me! Whence are we, and why are we? of what scene The actors or spectators?
We rest. — A dream has power to poison sleep; We rise. — One wandering thought pollutes the day; We feel, conceive or reason, laugh or weep; Embrace fond woe, or cast our cares away: It is the same! — For, be it joy or sorrow, The path of its departure still is free: Man's yesterday may ne'er be like his morrow; Nought may endure but Mutability.
The slave is a man, "the image of God," but "a little lower than the angels;" possessing a soul, eternal and indestructible; capable of endless happiness, or immeasurable woe; a creature of hopes and fears, of affections and passions, of joys and sorrows, and he is endowed with those mysterious powers by which man soars above the things of time and sense, and grasps, with undying tenacity, the elevating and sublimely glorious idea of a God. It is such a being that is smitten and blasted. The first work of slavery is to mar and deface those characteristics of its victims which distinguish men from things, and persons from property. Its first aim is to destroy all sense of high moral and religious responsibility. It reduces man to a mere machine. It cuts him off from his Maker, it hides from him the laws of God, and leaves him to grope his way from time to eternity in the dark, under the arbitrary and despotic control of a frail, depraved, and sinful fellow-man. As the serpent-charmer of India is compelled to extract the deadly teeth of his venomous prey before he is able to handle him with impunity, so the slaveholder must strike down the conscience of the slave before he can obtain the entire mastery over his victim.
And moody madness laughing wild Amid severest woe.
The Niobe of nations! there she stands, Childless and crownless, in her voiceless woe.
No words suffice the secret soul to show, For truth denies all eloquence to woe.
Auspicious Hope! in thy sweet garden grow Wreaths for each toil, a charm for every woe.
Hope
• Thomas Campbell, Pleasures of Hope, Part I, line 45.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Hope" (Quotes: Sorted alphabetically by author or source, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 375-78.)
Mercy is not itself, that oft looks so; Pardon is still the nurse of second woe.
Mercy
• William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure (1603), Act II, scene 1, line 297
• Source: Wikiquote: "Mercy" (Quotes: Alphabetized by author , Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 509-10.)
The need to impress others causes half the world's woes. Don't add to them. Be real, not impressive.
Would I were dead! if God's good will were so: For what is in this world but grief and woe?
World
• William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part III (c. 1591), Act II, scene 5, line 19.
• Source: Wikiquote: "World" (S)
Woe be unto thee, O Moab! the people of Chemosh perisheth: for thy sons are taken captives, and thy daughters captives.
Jeremiah 48:46
• King James Version of the Bible originally published in 1611. Full KJV Authorized Book Name: The Book of the Prophet Jeremiah; Common Book Name: Jeremiah; Chapter: 48; Verse: 46.
• The data for the years individual books were written is according to Dating the Bible on Wikipedia.
'''Of all the horrid, hideous notes of woe, Sadder than owl-songs or the midnight blast, Is that portentous phrase, ''I told you so.'''''
Of all the horrid, hideous notes of woe, Sadder than owl-songs or the midnight blast; Is that portentous phrase, "I told you so."
Why, headstrong liberty is lash'd with woe; There's nothing, situate under heaven's eye But hath his bound, in earth, in sea, in sky.
Nonconformists travel as a rule in bunches. You rarely find a nonconformist who goes it alone. And woe to him inside a nonconformist clique who does not conform with nonconformity.
A leader is one who, out of madness or goodness, volunteers to take upon himself the woe of the people. There are few men so foolish, hence the erratic quality of leadership in the world.
For life, with all it yields of joy and woe, And hope and fear (believe the aged friend), Is just our chance o' the prize of learning love,— How love might be, hath been indeed, and is.
O woe! O woeful, woeful, woeful day! Most lamentable day! Most woeful day That ever, ever I did yet behold! O day, O day, O day! O hateful day! Never was seen so black a day as this. O woeful day! O woeful day!
The starry Galileo with his woes.
Woe, woe for England! Not a whit for me!
Woes cluster. Rare are solitary woes; They love a train, they tread each other’s heel.
Woes, cluster; rare are solitary woes; They love a train, they tread each other's heel.
Woe
• Edward Young, Night Thoughts (1742-1745), Night III, line 63.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Woe" (Sourced, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 886.)
Woe to him who doesn't know how to wear his mask, be he king or pope!
That instant shut My woeful self up in a mourning house, Raining the tears of lamentation.
Tears
• William Shakespeare, Love's Labour's Lost (c. 1595-6), Act V, scene 2, line 817.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Tears" (Quotes)
When life is woe, And hope is dumb, The World says, "Go!" The Grave says, "Come!"
Death
• Arthur Guiterman, Betel-Nuts.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Death" (Quotes: Alphabetized by author or source , Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 163-81.)
There is no greater woe than in misery to remember the happy time, and that thy Teacher knows.
Teach me to feel another's woe, To right the fault I see; That mercy I to others show, That mercy show to me.
Poor, poor pitiful me. Poor, poor pitiful me. These young girls won't let me be. Lord have mercy on me. Woe is me.
So glistered the dire Snake, and into fraud Led Eve, our credulous mother, to the Tree Of Prohibition, root of all our woe.
Silence in love bewrays more woe Than words, though ne'er so witty; A beggar that is dumb, you know, May challenge double pity.
Silence
• Sir Walter Raleigh, The Silent Lover, Stanza 9.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Silence" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 707-10.)
And lovelier things have mercy shown To every failing but their own, And every woe a tear can claim Except an erring sister's shame.
Thou tyrant! Do not repent these things, for they are heavier Than all thy woes can stir: therefore, betake thee To nothing but despair.
Despair
• William Shakespeare, The Winter's Tale (c. 1610-11), Act III, scene 2, line 208.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Despair" (Quotes: Alphabetized by author , Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 189-90.)
Dress drains our cellar dry, And keeps our larder lean; puts out our fires And introduces hunger, frost, and woe, Where peace and hospitality might reign.
And fast through the midnight dark and drear, Through the whistling sleet and snow, Like a sheeted ghost, the vessel swept Towards the reef of Norman's Woe.
Thus unlamented pass the proud away, The gaze of fools and pageant of a day; So perish all, whose breast ne'er learn'd to glow For others' good, or melt at others' woe.
Pride
• Alexander Pope, Memory of an Unfortunate Lady, line 4.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Pride" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 632-33.)
Let the world slide, let the world go; A fig for care, and a fig for woe! If I can't pay, why I can owe, And death makes equal the high and low.
Let the world slide, let the world go; A fig for care and a fig for woe! If I can't pay, why I can owe, And death makes equal the high and low.
World
• John Heywood, Be Merry Friends; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 911-17.
• Source: Wikiquote: "World" (H)
Her rash hand in evil hour Forth reaching to the fruit, she pluck'd, she eat; Earth felt the wound, and Nature from her seat Sighing through all her works gave signs of woe That all was lost.
Like a fiend in a cloud, With howling woe, After night I do crowd, And with night will go; I turn my back to the east, From whence comforts have increased; For light doth seize my brain With frantic pain.
There is a strain in Marx of the cleric, of the vulgar moralist. He paints the capitalist and the bourgeois as incarnations of evil; it is they who are responsible for the woes of mankind. The dismissal of the individual’s responsibility for his own misery is the quintessence of clericalism.
I knock unbidden once at every gate— If sleeping, wake—if feasting, rise before I turn away—it is the hour of fate, And they who follow me reach every state Mortals desire, and conquer every foe Save death, but those who doubt or hesitate, Condemned to failure, penury and woe, Seek me in vain and uselessly implore, I answer not, and I return no more.
Opportunity
• John J. Ingalls, Opportunity.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Opportunity" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 570-72.)
To suffer woes which Hope thinks infinite; To forgive wrongs darker than Death or Night; To defy Power, which seems Omnipotent; To love, and bear; to hope, till Hope creates From its own wreck the thing it contemplates; Neither to change nor falter nor repent; This, like thy glory, Titan! is to be Good, great and joyous, beautiful and free; This is alone Life; Joy, Empire, and Victory!
Willful waste makes woeful want. (Wolfgang, 1992 p. 925)
English proverbs
• Stubbornly or waywardly wasting or throwing away something you have now will later make you regretful.
• Source: Wikiquote: "English proverbs" (Woeful)
What mighty woes To thy imperial race from woman rose!
What mighty woes To thy imperial race from woman rose.
Women
• Homer, The Odyssey, Book XI, line 541. Pope's translation.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Women" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 886-97.)
Chords that vibrate sweetest pleasure Thrill the deepest notes of woe.
[ Woe be to him that reads but one book. ]
Woes and wonders of power, that tonic hell, synthesis of poison and panacea.
Gardener, for telling me these news of woe, Pray God the plants thou graft'st may never grow.
We are kept all as securely in Love in woe as in weal, by the Goodness of God.
About Julian of Norwich
• Source: Wikiquote: "Julian of Norwich" (Revelations of Divine Love (c. 1393): "Revelations to one who could not read a Letter, Anno Dom. 1373" : this work provides almost all the information that is known about Julian. It is an account of visions, primarily ones she declares to have occurred on the 13th and 14th of May 1373, during a severe illness when she was thirty years old, written down nearly twenty years later by a scribe. There have been many translations of this work from archaic English, and thus many variants of the statements exist and somewhat different interpretations of their meanings have arisen., Chapter 1)
Striving to tell his woes, words would not come; For light cares speak, when mighty griefs are dumb.
Silence
• Samuel Daniel, Complaint of Rosamond, Stanza 114.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Silence" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 707-10.)
Woe to the flesh which depends upon the soul, woe to the soul which depends upon the flesh!
He who grown aged in this world of woe, In deeds, not years, piercing the depths of life, So that no wonder waits him.
Late February days; and now, at last, Might you have thought that Winter's woe was past; So fair the sky was and so soft the air.
A man walks down the street He says why am I short of attention Got a short little span of attention And woe my nights are so long
That none deserve eternal bliss I know: Unmerited the grace in mercy given, But none shall sink to everlasting woe That have not well deserved the wrath of Heaven.
A nation that has not the power of endurance, the power of dogged insistence on a determined policy, come weal or woe, has lost one chief element of greatness.
Shall he who soars, inspired by loftier views, Life's little cares and little pains refuse? Shall he not rather feel a double share Of mortal woe, when doubly arm'd to bear?
Life
• George Crabbe, Library.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Life" (Anonymous, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 440-55.)
For a tear is an intellectual thing, And a sigh is the sword of an Angel King, And the bitter groan of the martyr's woe Is an arrow from the Almighty's bow.
In silence, * * * Steals on soft-handed Charity, Tempering her gifts, that seem so free, By time and place, Till not a woe the bleak world see, But finds her grace.
Charity
• John Keble, The Christian Year, The Sunday After Ascension Day, Stanza 6.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Charity" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 106-107.)
If you trap the moment before it's ripe, The tears of repentance you'll certainly wipe; But if once you let the ripe moment go You can never wipe off the tears of woe.
A woman's counsel brought us first to woe, And made her man his paradise forego, Where at heart's ease he liv'd; and might have been As free from sorrow as he was from sin.
Women
• John Dryden, The Cock and the Fox, line 557.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Women" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 886-97.)
Painfully convinced of the unutterable wrongs and woes of slavery; profoundly believing that, according to the true spirit of the constitution and the sentiments of the fathers, it can find no place under our national government.
American Civil War
• Charles Sumner, as quoted in Freedom National, Slavery Sectional (27 July 1852), by C. Sumner, United States Senate.
• Source: Wikiquote: "American Civil War" (Conflict Brewing: The Secession Crisis (1860–1861))
The bright days of my youth They were full of hope The great journey that was before me then Was what was destined to be, bye bye. Now I'm sorrowful, The day is long past. Alas and woe, oh.
Enya
• "The Bright Days of My Youth" (original Irish Gaelic title "Na Laetha Geal M'óige")
• Source: Wikiquote: "Enya" (Song lyrics: Note: Though all vocals and instrumentals on her albums are done entirely by Enya, nearly all the lyrics to her music are written by Roma Ryan, or taken from traditional sources., Watermark (1988))
For agony and spoil Of nations beat to dust, For poisoned air and tortured soil And cold, commanded lust, And every secret woe The shuddering waters saw— Willed and fulfilled by high and low— Let them relearn the Law.
War
• Rudyard Kipling, Justice (Oct. 24, 1918).
• Source: Wikiquote: "War" (Quotes: Quotes are listed alphabetically by author., K)
We shall suddenly be taken from all our pain and from all our woe, and of His Goodness we shall come up above, where we shall have our Lord Jesus for our meed and be fulfilled with joy and bliss in Heaven.
About Julian of Norwich
• Source: Wikiquote: "Julian of Norwich" (Revelations of Divine Love (c. 1393): "Revelations to one who could not read a Letter, Anno Dom. 1373" : this work provides almost all the information that is known about Julian. It is an account of visions, primarily ones she declares to have occurred on the 13th and 14th of May 1373, during a severe illness when she was thirty years old, written down nearly twenty years later by a scribe. There have been many translations of this work from archaic English, and thus many variants of the statements exist and somewhat different interpretations of their meanings have arisen., Chapter 1)
God, from a beautiful necessity, is Love in all he doeth, Love, a brilliant fire, to gladden or consume: The wicked work their woe by looking upon love, and hating it: The righteous find their joys in yearning on its loveliness for ever.
Above all, beware of compromises. Hold on to your own principles in weal or woe and never adjust them to others’ “fads” through the greed of getting supporters. Your Atman is the support of the universe—whose support do you stand in need of?
Behold, we live through all things,—famine, thirst, Bereavement, pain; all grief and misery, All woe and sorrow; life inflicts its worst On soul and body,—but we cannot die, Though we be sick, and tired, and faint, and worn,— Lo, all things can be borne!
Experience
• Elizabeth Akers Allen, Endurance.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Experience" (Sourced, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 244-45.)
The nightingale as soon as April bringeth Unto her rested sense a perfect waking, While late bare earth, proud of new clothing, springeth, Sings out her woes, a thorn her song-book making. And mournfully bewailing, Her throat in tunes expresseth What grief her breast oppresseth.
Nightingales
• Sir Philip Sidney, O Philomela Fair.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Nightingales" (Sourced, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 557-59.)
The life of woman is full of woe, Toiling on and on and on, With breaking heart, and tearful eyes, The secret longings that arise, Which this world never satisfies! Some more, some less, but of the whole Not one quite happy, no, not one!
Lo these were they, whose souls the Furies steel'd, And curs'd with hearts unknowing how to yield. Thus unlamented pass the proud away, The gaze of fools, and pageant of a day! So perish all, whose breast ne'er learn'd to glow For others' good, or melt at others' woe.
I am: yet what I am none cares or knows, My friends forsake me like a memory lost: I am the self-consumer of my woes, They rise and vanis in oblivious host, Like shades in love and death's oblivion lost: And yet I am, and live with shadows tost
Most bankers dwell in marble halls, Which they get to dwell in because they encourage deposits and discourage withdrawals, And particularly because they all observe one rule which woe betides the banker who fails to heed it, Which is you must never lend any money to anybody unless they don't need it.
The love of Christ reaches to the very depths of earthly misery and woe, or it would not meet the case of the veriest sinner. It also reaches to the throne of the eternal, or man could not he lifted from his degraded condition, and our necessities would not be met, our desires would be unsatisfied.
Unjust war is to be abhorred; but woe to the nation that does not make ready to hold its own in time of need against all who would harm it! And woe thrice over to the nation in which the average man loses the fighting edge, loses the power to serve as a soldier if the day of need should arise!
Unfathomable Sea! whose waves are years, Ocean of Time, whose waters of deep woe Are brackish with the salt of human tears! Thou shoreless flood, which in thy ebb and flow Claspest the limits of mortality! And sick of prey, yet howling on for more, Vomitest thy wrecks on its inhospitable shore, Treacherous in calm, and terrible in storm, Who shall put forth on thee, Unfathomable sea?
Time
• Percy Bysshe Shelley, Time
• Source: Wikiquote: "Time" (Z, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 792-801.)
There is no act more moral between men than that of rule and obedience. Woe to him that claims obedience when it is not due; woe to him that refuses it when it is! God's law is in that, I say, however the Parchment-laws may run: there is a Divine Right or else a Diabolic Wrong at the heart of every claim that one man makes upon another.
Deep in the meadow, hidden far away A cloak of leaves, a moonbeam ray Forget your woes and let your troubles lay And when again it's morning, they'll wash away. Here it's safe, here it's warm Here the daisies guard you from every harm The final lines are barely audible. Here your dreams are sweet and tomorrow brings them true Here is the place where I love you.
Their joy needs another woe's to cushion it, Say a puddle, and someone littler to push in it. They observe with glee the ballistic results Of ice cream with spoons for catapults, And inform the assembly with tears and glares That everyone's presents are better than theirs. Oh, little women and little men, Someday I hope to love you again, But not till after the party's over, So give me the key to the doghouse, Rover
They may veil their eyes, but they cannot hide The sun’s meridian glow; The heel of a priest may tread thee down, And a tyrant work thee woe: But never a truth has been destroyed; They may curse it, and call it crime; Pervert and betray, or slander and slay Its teachers for a time. But the sunshine aye shall light the sky, As round and round we run; And the truth shall ever come uppermost, And justice shall be done.
Titan! to whom immortal eyes The sufferings of mortality Seen in their sad reality, Were not as things that gods despise; What was thy pity's recompense? A silent suffering, and intense; The rock, the vulture, and the chain, All that the proud can feel of pain, The agony they do not show, The suffocating sense of woe, Which speaks but in its loneliness, And then is jealous lest the sky Should have a listener, nor will sigh Until its voice is echoless.
Where I say that He abideth sorrowfully and moaning, it meaneth all the true feeling that we have in our self, in contrition and compassion, and all sorrowing and moaning that we are not oned with our Lord. And all such that is speedful, it is Christ in us. And though some of us feel it seldom, it passeth never from Christ till what time He hath brought us out of all our woe. For love suffereth never to be without pity.
I marvelled how this Servant might meekly suffer there all this woe, and I beheld with carefulness to learn if I could perceive in him any fault, or if the Lord should assign to him any blame. And in sooth there was none seen: for only his goodwill and his great desire was cause of his falling; and he was unlothful, and as good inwardly as when he stood afore his Lord, ready to do his will. And right thus continually his loving Lord full tenderly beholdeth him.
For all mankind that shall be saved by the sweet Incarnation and blissful Passion of Christ, all is the Manhood of Christ: for He is the Head and we be His members. To which members the day and the time is unknown when every passing woe and sorrow shall have an end, and the everlasting joy and bliss shall be fulfilled; which day and time for to see, all the Company of Heaven longeth. And all that shall be under heaven that shall come thither, their way is by longing and desire.
Our faith is a light by nature coming of our endless Day, that is our Father, God. In which light our Mother, Christ, and our good Lord, the Holy Ghost, leadeth us in this passing life. This light is measured discreetly, needfully standing to us in the night. The light is cause of our life; the night is cause of our pain and of all our woe: in which we earn meed and thanks of God. For we, with mercy and grace, steadfastly know and believe our light, going therein wisely and mightily.
The careful pilot of my proper woe.
The long historian of my country's woes.
I was not always a man of woe.
God's mills grind slow, But they grind woe.
Be ignorance thy choice, where knowledge leads to woe.
The desert grows: woe to him in whom deserts hide ...
Out of my own great woe I make my little songs.
Here is woe, a self and not the mask of woe.
Myself not ignorant of woe, Compassion I have learned to show.
"Woe to the vanquished" (Vae victis) in history as on the battle-field.
History
• Emanuele Celesia, The Conspiracy of Gianluigi Fieschi: or, Genoa in the Sixteenth Century. (1866), p.xxiv
• Source: Wikiquote: "History" (Quotes: Alphabetized by author )
Woe to the book you can read without constantly wondering about the author!
But woe awaits a country when She sees the tears of bearded men.
The heart bowed down by weight of woe To weakest hope will cling.
The hues of bliss more brightly glow, Chastis'd by sabler tints of woe.
Bliss
• Thomas Gray, Ode on the Pleasure arising from Vicissitude, line 45.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Bliss" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 72-73.)
But woe awaits a country, when She sees the tears of bearded men.
Woe unto you,… for ye pay tithe of mint and anise and cummin.
Woe
• Matthew, XXIII, 23.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Woe" (Sourced, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 886.)
Toil is the lot of all, and bitter woe The fate of many.
Fate
• Homer, The Iliad, Book XXI, line 646. Bryant's translation.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Fate" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 261-65.)
If sorrow can admit society, Tell o'er your woes again by viewing mine.
Sorrow
• William Shakespeare, Richard III (c. 1591), Act IV, scene 4, line 38.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Sorrow" (Sourced, William Shakespeare)
Many faint with toil, That few may know the cares and woe of sloth.
Labor
• Percy Bysshe Shelley, Queen Mab (1813), Canto III.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Labor" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 423-25.)
The wrath of Peleus' son, the direful spring Of all the Grecian woes, O goddess sing!
The Iliad of Homer (Alexander Pope)
• Line 1. Alternately reported as: "wrath, to Greece the direful spring
Of woes unnumber'd, heavenly goddess, sing!" in Bartlett's Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).
• Source: Wikiquote: "The Iliad of Homer (Alexander Pope)" (The Iliad of Homer (poetic interpretation, 1715 to 1720), Book I)
Woe to him, * * * who has no court of appeal against the world's judgment.
Judgment
• Thomas Carlyle, Essays, Mirabeau; in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 411-12.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Judgment" (Quotes: Quotes are arranged alphabetically by author, A - D)
Grief tears his heart, and drives him to and fro In all the raging impotence of woe.
Grief tears his heart, and drives him to and fro, In all the raging impotence of woe.
Grief
• Homer, The Iliad, Book XXII, line 526. Pope's translation.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Grief" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 342-44.)
'''Beyond this day, no thinking person could fail to see what woed in Schindler's List (1982) by Thomas Keneally, Ch. 15.
I could see their woe and sadness, and I pledged to ease their pain; their suffering would not be in vain.
Affliction is the good man's shining scene; Prosperity conceals his brightest ray; As night to stars, woe lustre gives to man.
Affliction
• Edward Young, Night Thoughts (1742-1745), Night IX, line 415.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Affliction" (Sourced, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 12.)
Do not dump your woes upon people — keep the sad story of your life to yourself. Troubles grow by recounting them.
Alas! by some degree of woe We every bliss must gain; The heart can ne'er a transport know That never feels a pain.
Thin partitions do divide The bounds where good and ill reside; That nought is perfect here below; But bliss still bordering upon woe.
Bliss
Weekly Magazine, Edinburgh, Volume XXII, p. 50 (1770).
• Source: Wikiquote: "Bliss" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 72-73.)
Alas! by some degree of woe We every bliss must gain; The heart can ne'er a transport know, That never feels a pain.
Bliss
• George Lyttelton, 1st Baron Lyttelton, Song.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Bliss" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 72-73.)
The rose looks out in the valley, And thither will I go, To the rosy vale, where the nightingale Sings his song of woe.
Nightingales
• Gil Vicente, The Nightingale. Bowring's translation.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Nightingales" (Sourced, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 557-59.)
He has grown aged in this world of woe, In deeds, not years, piercing the depths of life. So that no wonder waits him.
Age
• Lord Byron, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto III (1816), Stanza 5.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Age" (Sourced, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 12-17.)
But now let us descend to greater woe. Already every star sinks that was rising when I set out, and too long stay is forbidden.
Woe to the youth whom Fancy gains, Winning from Reason's hand the reins, Pity and woe! for such a mind Is soft, contemplative, and kind.
Fancies
• Walter Scott, Rokeby, Canto I, Stanza 31.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Fancies" (Sourced, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 260.)
What bird so sings, yet does so wail? O, 'tis the ravish'd nightingale— Jug, jug, jug, jug—tereu—she cries, And still her woes at midnight rise.
Nightingales
• John Lyly, The Songs of Birds.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Nightingales" (Sourced, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 557-59.)
Come, now again, thy woes impart, Tell all thy sorrows, all thy sin; We cannot heal the throbbing heart Till we discern the wounds within.
Sin
• George Crabbe, Hell of Justice, Part II.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Sin" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 720-12.)
Men must reap the things they sow, Force from force must ever flow, Or worse; but 'tis a bitter woe That love or reason cannot change.
Change
• Percy Bysshe Shelley, Lines Written among the Euganean Hills, line 232. in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 93-96.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Change" (Sourced, S)
A woman's body is a dark and monstrous mystery; between her supple thighs a heavy whirlpool swirls, two rivers crash, and woe to him who slips and falls!
Three things belong to God and do not belong to men: the irrevocable, the irreparable and the indissoluble. Woe to men if they introduce it in their laws!
Line after line my gushing eyes o'erflow, Led thro' a sad variety of woe: Now warm in love, now with'ring in my bloom, Lost in a convent's solitary gloom!
The smallest effort is not lost, Each wavelet on the ocean tost Aids in the ebb-tide or the flow; Each rain-drop makes some floweret blow; Each struggle lessens human woe.
Such grief might make the mountain stoop, reverse the waters where they flow, but cannot burst these ponderous bolts that block us from the prison cells crowded with mortal woe...
Anna Akhmatova
• The mountains bow before this anguish,
The great river does not flow.
In mortal sadness the convicts languish;
The bolts stay frozen.
 • Translated by D. M. Thomas
• Source: Wikiquote: "Anna Akhmatova" (Quotes: There have been numerous translations of Akhmatova's poems into English, with some variation in the titles of poems or their sections. The date of publication of her later works is often many years or decades after their composition. , Requiem; 1935-1940 (1963; 1987): Written over many years, this work was first published in 1963, but not in complete form until 1987. The base translation used here is that of Stanley Kunitz and Max Hayward, with variant translations used as noted. , Dedication)
Ah woe is me, through all my days Wisdom and wealth I both have got, And fame and name and great men’s praise; But Love, ah! Love I have it not.
What woeful stuff this madrigal would be, In some starved hackney sonneteer, or me! But let a lord once own the happy lines, How the wit brightens! how the style refines!
Oh, Conscience! Conscience! man's most faithful friend, Him canst thou comfort, ease, relieve, defend; But if he will thy friendly checks forego, Thou art, oh! woe for me, his deadliest foe!
Conscience
• George Crabbe, Struggles of Conscience, last lines.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Conscience" (Quotes: Alphabetized by author, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 130-31.)
Woe to you, my Princess, when I come... you shall see who is the stronger, a gentle girl who doesn't eat enough or a big wild man who has cocaine in his body.
Come sleep, O sleep, the certain knot of peace, The baiting place of wit, the balm of woe, The poor man’s wealth, the prisoner’s release, The indifferent judge between the high and low.
Money was made, not to command our will, But all our lawful pleasures to fulfil. Shame and woe to us, if we our wealth obey; The horse doth with the horseman run away.
Money
• Abraham Cowley, Imitations, Tenth Epistle of Horace, Book I, line 75. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 521-24.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Money" (C)
Behind the steps that Misery treads Approaching Comfort view: The hues of bliss more brightly glow Chastised by sabler tints of woe, And blended form, with artful strife, The strength and harmony of life.
Even such a man, so faint, so spiritless, So dull, so dead in look, so woe-begone, Drew Priam’s curtain in the dead of night, And would have told him, half his Troy was burn'd.
Woe unto you, O torrent of human custom! Who shall stay your course? When will you ever run dry? How long will you carry down the sons of Eve into that vast and hideous ocean.
Still in the garden shadows art Thou pleading, Staining the night dews with Thine agony; But one is there Thy woe and prayer unheeding, And to their guileless prey Thy murderers leading, Lord, is it I?
Apostasy
• George Huntingdon, reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 14.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Apostasy" (Sourced)
Her rash hand in evil hour Forth reaching to the fruit, she plucked, she eat: Earth felt the wound, and Nature from her seat, Sighing through all her works, gave signs of woe That all was lost.
The wind breath'd soft as lover's sigh, And, oft renew'd, seem'd oft to die, With breathless pause between, O who, with speech of war and woes, Would wish to break the soft repose Of such enchanting scene!
What helps it now, that Byron bore, With haughty scorn which mocked the smart, Through Europe to the Aetolian shore The pageant of his bleeding heart? That thousands counted every groan, And Europe made his woe her own?
About Lord Byron
• Matthew Arnold, "Stanzas from the Grand Chartreuse," Fraser's Magazine (April 1855); reprinted in New Poems (1867)
• Source: Wikiquote: "Lord Byron" (Quotes about Lord Byron: Alphabetized by author )
Lead out the pageant: sad and slow, As fits an universal woe, Let the long, long procession go, And let the sorrowing crowd about it grow, And let the mournful martial music blow; The last great Englishman is low.
Each set of woes can be left behind in a folder in a drawer at the end of the day. Whereas in the outside world there is no end of obligation, no protection from the needs and grief of others.
Their only labour was to kill the time; And labour dire it is, and weary woe, They sit, they loll, turn o'er some idle rhyme, Then, rising sudden, to the glass they go, Or saunter forth, with tottering steps and slow.
Woe unto thee if after all thy profession thou shouldst be found under the power of ignorance, lost in formality, drowned in earthly-mindedness, envenomed with malice, exalted in an opinion of thine own righteousness, leavened with hypocrisy and carnal ends in God's service.
Joseph Alleine
• P. 336.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Joseph Alleine" (Sourced, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895): Quotes reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895).)
Woe! then to those who write the Book with their hands then say, This is from God; so that they may take for it a small price. So woe! to them for what their hands write and woe! to them for what they earn.
Behold, we live through all things,—famine, thirst, Bereavement, pain; all grief and misery, All woe and sorrow; life inflicts its worst On soul and body,—but we can not die, Though we be sick and tired and faint and worn,— Lo, all things can be borne!
'Twas easy following where invention trod — All eyes can see when light flows out from God. And thus did Jubal to his race reveal Music their larger soul, where woe and weal Filling the resonant chords, the song, the dance, Moved with a wider-winged utterance.
All for myself the sigh would swell, The tear of anguish start; I little knew what wilder woe Had filled the Poet's heart. I did not know the nights of gloom, The days of misery; The long, long years of dark despair, That crushed and tortured thee.
For full indeed is earth of woes, and full the sea; and in the day as well as night diseases unbidden haunt mankind, silently bearing ills to men, for all-wise Zeus hath taken from them their voice. So utterly impossible is it to escape the will of Zeus.
The true knight of faith is a witness, never a teacher, and therein lies his deep humanity, which is worth a good deal more than this silly participation in others' weal and woe which is honored by the name of sympathy, whereas in fact it is nothing but vanity.
But how is Mneme dreaded by the race, Who scorn her warnings and despise her grace? By her unveil'd each horrid crime appears, Her awful hand a cup of wormwood bears. Days, years mispent, O what a hell of woe! Hers the worst tortures that our souls can know.
I sing the Poppy! The frail snowy weed! The flower of Mercy! that within its heart Doth keep "a drop serene" for human need, A drowsy balm for every bitter smart. For happy hours the Rose will idly blow , The Poppy hath a charm for pain and woe.
Poppies
• Mary A. Barr, White Poppies.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Poppies" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922): Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 613-614.)
This hath ever been a comfort to me, that I chose Jesus to my Heaven, by His grace, in all this time of Passion and sorrow; and that hath been a learning to me that I should evermore do so: choose only Jesus to my Heaven in weal and woe.
The damned are in the abyss of Hell, as within a woeful city, where they suffer unspeakable torments, in all their senses and members, because as they have employed all their senses and their members in sinning, so shall they suffer in each of them the punishment due to sin.
Get rich, if you will — you take great risks. But Christianity does not say to any man, You must be worth only so much, extend your business only so far. It says, Use your riches for the glory of God. If they once usurp His place, woe to you!
Wealth
• Herrick Johnson, p. 521
• Source: Wikiquote: "Wealth" (Quotes, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895): Quotes reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895).)
God grant you, friends, a helping hand— In cares of state and private plights, In rowdy feasts of friendship's band, In passion's sweet and secret rites! God grant you, friends, a helping hand— In daily woes and days of strife, On vacant sa, in distant land, In every black abyss of life!
There is no treasure the which may be compared unto a faithful friend; Gold soone decayeth, and worldly wealth consumeth, and wasteth in the winde; But love once planted in a perfect and pure minde indureth weale and woe; The frownes of fortune, come they never so unkinde, cannot the same overthrowe.
Friendship
• Roxburghe Ballads. The Bride's Good-Morrow. Ed. by John Payne Collier.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Friendship" (Quotes: Alphabetized by author or source, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations)
A dungeon horrible, on all sides round, As one great furnace, flamed; yet from those flames No light, but rather darkness visible Serv'd only to discover sights of woe, Regions of sorrow, doleful shades, where peace And rest can never dwell, hope never comes That comes to all; but torture without end.
Hell
• John Milton, Paradise Lost (1667; 1674), Book I, line 61.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Hell" (Quotes: Alphabetized by author or source)
W'en you see a man in woe, Walk right up and say "hullo." Say "hullo" and "how d'ye do," "How's the world a-usin' you?" . . . . . W'en you travel through the strange Country t'other side the range, Then the souls you've cheered will know Who you be, an' say "hullo."
Mankind
• Sam Walter Foss, Hullo.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Mankind" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 380.)
A second voice was at mine ear, A little whisper silver-clear, A murmur, "Be of better cheer". As from some blissful neighbourhood, A notice faintly understood, "I see the end, and know the good". A little hint to solace woe, A hint, a whisper breathing low, "I may not speak of what I know".
Is all our Life, then, but a dream Seen faintly in the golden gleam Athwart Time's dark resistless stream? Bowed to the earth with bitter woe Or laughing at some raree-show We flutter idly to and fro.Man's little Day in haste we spend, And, from its merry noontide, send No glance to meet the silent end.
O, hark! what mean those yells and cries? His chain some furious madman breaks; He comes—I see his glaring eyes; Now, now, my dungeon grate he shakes. Help! Help! He's gone!—O fearful woe, Such screams to hear, such sights to see! My brain, my brain,—I know, I know I am not mad but soon shall be.
Insanity
• Matthew Gregory Lewis ("Monk Lewis"), The Maniac.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Insanity" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 396-97.)
How near another's heart we oft may stand, Yet all unknowing what we fain would know Its heights of joy, its depths of bitter woe, As, wrecked upon some desert island's strand, They watch our white sails near and nearer grow; Then we, who for their rescue death would dare, Unheeding pass, and leave them to despair.
There will be many men who will move one against another, holding in their hands a cutting tool. But these will not do each other any injury beyond tiring each other; for, when one pushes forward the other will draw back. But woe to him who comes between them! For he will end by being cut in pieces.
O closed about by narrowing nunnery-walls, What knowest thou of the world, and all its lights And shadows, all the wealth and all the woe? If ever Lancelot, that most noble knight, Were for one hour less noble than himself, Pray for him that he scape the doom of fire, And weep for her that drew him to his doom.
They talk about a woman's sphere as though it had a limit; There's not a place in Earth or Heaven, There's not a task to mankind given, There's not a blessing or a woe, There's not a whispered yes or no, There's not a life, or death, or birth, That has a feather's weight or worth— Without a woman in it.
Women
• C. E. Bowman, "The Sphere of Woman". in Joseph M. Chapple, Heart Throbs in Prose and Verse (1905), p. 343. A similar version:
They talk about 'a woman's sphere'
As though it has a limit;
There's not a spot on sea or shore,
In sanctum, office, shop or store,
Without a woman in it.
Author unknown; reported in Jennie Day Haines, Sovereign Woman Versus Mere Man (1905), p. 50.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Women" (Quotes)
He saith: Accuse not self overdone much, deeming that thy tribulation and thy woe is all for thy fault; for I will not that thou be heavy or sorrowful indiscreetly. For I tell thee, howsoever thou do, thou shalt have woe. And therefore I will that thou wisely know thy penance; and shalt see in truth that all thy living is penance profitable.
Because Mankind is glad and brave and young, Full of gay flames that white and scarlet glow, All joys and passions that Mankind may know By you were nobly felt and nobly sung. Because Mankind's heart every day is wrung By Fate's wild hands that twist and tear it so, Therefore you echoed Man's undying woe, A harp Aeolian on Life's branches hung.
Creation is in fact a fault, man’s famous sin thereby appearing as a minor version of a much graver one. What are we guilty of, except of having followed, more or less slavishly, the Creator’s example? Easy to recognize in ourselves the fatality which was His: not for nothing have we issued from the hands of a wicked and woebegone god, a god accursed.
All our knowledge merely helps us to die a more painful death than the animals that know nothing. A day will come when science will turn upon its error and no longer hesitate to shorten our woes. A day will come when it will dare and act with certainty; when life, grown wiser, will depart silently at its hour, knowing that it has reached its term.
[...] the whole world is bound together as never before; the bonds are sometimes those of hatred rather than love, but they are bonds nevertheless. Frowning or hopeful, every man of leadership in any line of thought or effort must now look beyond the limits of his own country. [...] For weal or for woe, the peoples of mankind are knit together far closer than ever before.
Slow, slow, fresh fount, keep time with my salt tears: Yet, slower, yet; O faintly, gentle springs: List to the heavy part the music bears, Woe weeps out her division, when she sings. Droop herbs, and flowers, Fall grief in showers, Our beauties are not ours; O, I could still, Like melting snow upon some craggy hill, Drop, drop, drop, drop, Since nature's pride is now, a withered daffodil.
I will on thee as on a comet look, A comet, the sad world's ill-boding book; Thy light as luctual and stain'd with woes I'll judge, where penal flames sit mixt and close. But though some think thou shin'st but to restrain Bold storms, and simply dost attend on rain; Yet I know well, and so our sins require, Thou dost but court cold rain, till rain turns fire.
Woe to that nation whose literature is disturbed by the intervention of power. Because that is not just a violation against "freedom of print", it is the closing down of the heart of the nation, a slashing to pieces of its memory. The nation ceases to be mindful of itself, it is deprived of its spiritual unity, and despite a supposedly common language, compatriots suddenly cease to understand one another
Woe unto you, lawyers! for ye have taken away the key of knowledge: ye entered not in yourselves, and them that were entering in ye hindered. And as he said these things unto them, the scribes and the Pharisees began to urge him vehemently, and to provoke him to speak of many things: Laying wait for him, and seeking to catch something out of his mouth, that they might accuse him.
Who hath woe? who hath sorrow? who hath contentions? who hath babbling? who hath wounds without cause? who hath redness of eyes? They that tarry long at the wine; they that go to seek mixed wine. Look not thou upon the wine when it is red, when it giveth its color in the cup, when it moveth itself aright: at the last it biteth like a serpent, and stingeth like an adder.
Dear, I took these trackless masses Fresh from Him who fashioned them; Wrought in rock, and hewed fair passes, Flower set, as sets a gem. Aye, I built in woe. God willed it; Woe that passeth ghosts of guilt. Yet I built as His birds builded — Builded singing as I built. All is finished! Roads of flowers Wait your loyal little feet. All completed? Nay, the hours Till you come are incomplete.
Auspicious Hope! in thy sweet garden grow Wreaths for each toil, a charm for every woe: Won by their sweets, in nature's languid hour, The way-worn pilgrim seeks thy summer bower; There, as the wild bee murmurs on the wing, What peaceful dreams thy handmaid spirits bring! What viewless forms th' Æolian organ play, And sweep the furrow'd lines of anxious thought away! Angel of life! thy glittering wings explore Earth's loneliest bounds, and Ocean's wildest shore.
Human virtue, if we went down to the roots of it, is not so rare. The materials of human virtue are everywhere abundant as the light of the sun: raw materials,—O woe, and loss, and scandal thrice and threefold, that they so seldom are elaborated, and built into a result! that they lie yet unelaborated, and stagnant in the souls of wide-spread dreary millions, fermenting, festering; and issue at last as energetic vice instead of strong practical virtue!
Woe unto them that decree unrighteous decrees, and that write grievousness which they have prescribed; To turn aside the needy from judgment, and to take away the right from the poor of my people, that widows may be their prey, and that they may rob the fatherless! And what will ye do in the day of visitation, and in the desolation which shall come from far? to whom will ye flee for help? and where will ye leave your glory?
For in that time He shewed our frailty and our fallings, our afflictings and our settings at nought, our despites and our outcastings, and all our woe so far forth as methought it might befall in this life. And therewith He shewed His blessed Might, His blessed Wisdom, His blessed Love: that He keepeth us in this time as tenderly and as sweetly to His worship, and as surely to our salvation, as He doeth when we are in most solace and comfort.
Let no one who loves be called altogether unhappy. Even love unreturned has its rainbow, and Babbie knew that Gavin loved her. Yet she stood in woe among the stiff berry bushes, as one who stretches forth her hands to Love and sees him looking for her, and knows she must shrink from the arms she would lie in, and only call to him in a voice he cannot hear. This is not a love that is always bitter. It grows sweet with age.
Obama blames economic woes, some real some manufactured (“inequality”) on a philosophy and policy that was abandoned a century ago. What doesn’t exist is what he says didn’t work. Obama absurdly suggests that timid, half-hearted, compromisers, like George W. Bush, installed laissez-faire capitalism–on the grounds that they tinkered with one or two regulations (Glass-Steagall) and marginal tax rates–while blanking out the fact that under the Bush administration, government spending ballooned, growing much faster than under Clinton, and 50,000 new regulations were added to the Federal Register.
Understanding sometimes is not enough to explain something. Only faith is sufficient. The Führer in Nuremberg said: 'Woe to him who does not believe!' He who does not believe has no soul. He is empty. He has no ideals. He has nothing to live for. He has no sunshine, no light, no joy in life. He is a poor, poor man. What is wealth? What are possessions? What does it all mean? Problems come despite them, only faith is left. Woe to him who does not believe!
Robert Ley
• Speech given on November 3, 1936. Quoted in Wir alle helfen dem Führer "Schicksal — ich glaube!" (Munich: Zentralverlag der NSDAP, 1937), pages 103-114
• Source: Wikiquote: "Robert Ley" (Quotes)
Ik geloof nooit dat de oorlog de schuld is alleen van de grote mannen, van de regeerders en kapitalisten. O neen, de kleine man doet het net zo goed graag, anders zouden de volkeren er toch al lang tegen in opstand zijn gekomen! Er is nu eenmaal in de mensen een drang tot vernieling, een drang tot doodslaan, tot vermoorden en razen en zolang de gehele mensheid, zonder uitzondering, geen grote metamorphose heeft ondergaan, zal de oorlog woeden, zal alles wat opgebouwd, aangekweekt en gegroeid is, weer geschonden en vernietigd worden, waarna de mensheid opnieuw moet beginnen.
Anne Frank
• I don't believe that the big men, the politicians and the capitalists alone are guilty of the war. Oh, no, the little man is just as keen, otherwise the people of the world would have risen in revolt long ago! There is an urge and rage in people to destroy, to kill, to murder, and until all mankind, without exception, undergoes a great change, wars will be waged, everything that has been built up, cultivated and grown, will be destroyed and disfigured, after which mankind will have to begin all over again.
• May 3, 1944
• Source: Wikiquote: "Anne Frank" (The Diary of a Young Girl: Composed from her 13th birthday on 12 June 1942, until 1 August 1944, just prior to her family's capture.)
The modern institution of the presidency is the primary political evil Americans face, and the cause of nearly all our woes. It squanders the national wealth and starts unjust wars against foreign peoples that have never done us any harm. It wrecks our families, tramples on our rights, invades our communities, and spies on our bank accounts. It skews the culture toward decadence and trash. It tells lie after lie. Teachers used to tell school kids that anyone can be president. This is like saying anyone can go to Hell. It’s not an inspiration; it’s a threat.
As Love and I late harbour'd in one inn, With proverbs thus each other entertain: "In love there is no lack," thus I begin; "Fair words make fools," replieth he again; "Who spares to speak doth spare to speed," quoth I; "As well," saith he, "too forward as too slow"; "Fortune assists the boldest," I reply; "A hasty man," quoth he, "ne'er wanted woe"; "Labour is light where love," quoth I," doth pay"; Saith he, "Light burden's heavy, if far borne"; Quoth I, "The main lost, cast the by away"; "Y'have spun a fair thread," he replies in scorn. And having thus awhile each other thwarted Fools as we met, so fools again we parted.
Proverbs
• Michael Drayton, Proverbs.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Proverbs" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 638-39.)
Believe me, it is no time for words when the wounds are fresh and bleeding; no time for homilies when the lightning's shaft has smitten and the man lies stunned and stricken. Then let the comforter be silent; let him sustain by his presence, not by his preaching; by his sympathetic silence, not by his speech. "Afterward," when the storm is spent, he may venture to open his mouth; "afterward," when the morn has dawned, he may seek "to justify the ways of God to man;" for " afterward" the sufferer will be prepared to hear, and "afterward" the sufferer himself may be able to extract sweetness from bitterness, music from mourning, songs from sorrow, and "the peaceable fruit of righteousness" from the root of wretchedness and woe.
Grief
• George C. Lorimer, Isms Old and New: Winter Sunday Evening Sermon-series for 1880-81 (1881), Chapter 6: Pessimism, or The Mystery of Human Suffering, "Unwise Comforters", p. 147.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Grief" (Quotes)
"If the trade is at present carried on to the same extent and nearly in the same manner, while we are delaying from year to year to put a stop to our part in it, the blood of many thousands of our helpless, much injured fellow creatures is crying against us. The pitiable state of the survivors who are torn from their relatives, connections, and their native land must be taken into account. I fear the African trade is a national sin, for the enormities which accompany it are now generally known; and though, perhaps, the greater part of the nation would be pleased if it were suppressed, yet, as it does not immediately affect their own interest, they are passive. {...] Can we wonder that the calamities of the present war begin to be felt at home, when we ourselves wilfully and deliberately inflict much greater calamities upon the native Africans, who never offended us?. "Woe unto thee that spoilest, and thou wast not spoiled when thou shalt cease to spoil, thou shalt be spoiled"
John Newton
• Alluding to the biblical verse in Isaiah 33:1. As quoted in The Works of the Rev. John Newton... to which are Prefixed Memoirs of His Life (1839), Vol. 2, U. Hunt., page 438.
• Source: Wikiquote: "John Newton" (Sourced)
I got an agreement written between me and Umaiya bin Khalaf that Umaiya would look after my property (or family) in Mecca and I would look after his in Medina. When I mentioned the word 'Ar-Rahman' in the documents, Umaiya said, "I do not know 'Ar-Rahman.' Write down to me your name, (with which you called yourself) in the Pre-lslamic Period of Ignorance." So, I wrote my name ' 'Abdu 'Amr'. On the day (of the battle) of Badr, when all the people went to sleep, I went up the hill to protect him. Bilal(1) saw him (i.e. Umaiya) and went to a gathering of Ansar and said, "(Here is) Umaiya bin Khalaf! Woe to me if he escapes!" So, a group of Ansar went out with Bilal to follow us ('Abdur-Rahman and Umaiya). Being afraid that they would catch us, I left Umaiya's son for them to keep them busy but the Ansar killed the son and insisted on following us. Umaiya was a fat man, and when they approached us, I told him to kneel down, and he knelt, and I laid myself on him to protect him, but the Ansar killed him by passing their swords underneath me, and one of them injured my foot with his sword. (The sub narrator said, " 'Abdur-Rahman used to show us the trace of the wound on the back of his foot.")
After Ariel Sharon's severe stroke: "Ladies and Gentlemen I said last year that Israel was entering into the most dangerous periods of its entire existence as a nation. That is intensifying this year with the loss of Sharon. Sharon was personally a very likeable person and I am sad to see him in this condition, but I think we need to look at the Bible and the Book of Joel. The prophet Joel makes it very clear that God has enmity against those who 'divide my land.' God considers this land to be His. You read the Bible and He says 'this is my land' and for any Prime Minister of Israel who decides he is going to carve it up and give it away, God says 'no, this is mine.' I had a wonderful meeting with Yitzhak Rabin in 1974. He was tragically assassinated, it was a terrible thing that happened but nevertheless he was dead. And now Ariel Sharon who again was a very likeable person, a delightful person to be with, I prayed with him personally, but here he's at the point of death. He was dividing God's land and I would say woe unto any Prime Minister of Israel who takes a similar course to appease the EU, the United Nations, or the United States of America. God says 'this land belongs to me. You'd better leave it alone.'" — 2006 http://rawstory.com/news/2005/Robertson_said_Sharon_being_punished_by_0105.html
And woe succeeds to woe.
Woe
• Homer, The Iliad, Book XVI, line 139. Pope's translation.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Woe" (Sourced, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 886.)
Waste brings woe, and sorrow hates despair.
Woe
• Robert Greene, Sonnet.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Woe" (Sourced, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 886.)
Time is of every woe the healer.
He scorn'd his own, who felt another's woe.
Philanthropy
• Thomas Campbell, Gertrude of Wyoming, Part I, Stanza 24.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Philanthropy" (Sourced, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 595-96.)
Thus woe succeeds a woe, as wave a wave.
Surely a limit boundet every woe, But mine enduring anguish hath no end
Oh, pity human woe! 'T is what the happy to the unhappy owe.
Weep on; and, as thy sorrows flow, I'll taste the luxury of woe.
Sorrow
• Thomas Moore, Anacreontic.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Sorrow" (Sourced, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 733-36.)
Weep on! and as thy sorrows flow, I 'll taste the luxury of woe.
Lorin Morgan-Richards has woven the most whimsically woeful stories this side of Edward Gorey!
Here Lucifer the mighty Captive reigns; Proud, 'midst his Woes, and Tyrant in his Chains.
Accept these grateful tears! for thee they flow,— For thee, that ever felt another's woe!
Accept these grateful tears! for thee they flow, For thee, that ever felt another's woe!
Tears
• Homer, The Iliad, Book XIX, line 319. Pope's translation.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Tears" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 780-83.)
Care-charming Sleep, thou easer of all woes, Brother to Death … thou son of Night.
Sleep
• John Fletcher, The Tragedy of Valentinian, Act V. 2.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Sleep" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 716-21.)
With living colours give my verse to glow: The sad memorial of a tale of woe!
We bear it calmly, though a ponderous woe, And still adore the hand that gives the blow.
A wail in the wind is all I hear; A voice of woe for a lover's loss.
When one is past, another care we have; Thus woe succeeds a woe, as wave a wave.
Woe
• Robert Herrick, Sorrows Succeed.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Woe" (Sourced, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 886.)
So perish all whose breast ne'er learned to glow For other's good or melt at other's woe.
Woe
• Alexander Pope, Elegy to an Unfortunate Lady, referencing Homer, The Odyssey, Book XVIII, 269.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Woe" (Sourced, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 886.)
SHAKOONTALÁ: [Feeling for the ring]. Alas! alas! woe is me! There is no ring on my finger!
What sorrow was, thou bad'st her know, And from her own she learned to melt at others' woe.
"Woe to the empire- we are forsaken. The gods are angry!" -Statue of Zernou, the first Carthaki emperor
To labour is the lot of man below; And when Jove gave us life, he gave us woe.
Yet taught by time, my heart has learn'd to glow For others' good, and melt at others' woe.
Thou hast been called, O sleep! the friend of woe; But ’tis the happy that have called thee so.
"Woe worth you, Molly Whuppie! never you come again" "Twice yet, carle," quoth she, "I'll come to Spain." Pied Piper
Just are the ways of heaven; from Heaven proceed The woes of man; Heaven doom'd the Greeks to bleed.
Heaven
• Homer, The Odyssey, Book VIII, line 128. Pope's translation.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Heaven" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 359-62.)
Thou hast been called, O Sleep, the friend of Woe, But 'tis the happy who have called thee so.
Sleep
• Robert Southey, The Curse of Kehama, Canto XV, Stanza 12.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Sleep" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 716-21.)
Thus hand in hand through life we'll go; Its checker'd paths of joy and woe With cautious steps we'll tread
There give thy griefs full vent to flow O'er the unconscious dead, With no spectator to thy woe But my attendant shade.
O, woe is me, T'have seen what I have seen, see what I see! Ophelia, William Shakespeare, HamletAct III scene 1, line 182
Woe
• Source: Wikiquote: "Woe" (Sourced, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 886.)
In the bitter waves of woe, Beaten and tossed about By the sullen winds which blow From the desolate shores of doubt.
Sorrow
• Washington Gladden, Ultima Veritas.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Sorrow" (Sourced, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 733-36.)
O fast her amber blood doth flow From the heart-wounded Incense Tree, Fast as earth’s deep-embosom’d woe In silent rivulets to the sea!
There's a hope for every woe, And a balm for every pain, But the first joys of our heart Come never back again!
Come all sad, and solemn shows, That are quick-eyed Pleasure's foes; We convent nought else but woes. We convent nought else but woes.
On Thee we fling our burdening woe, O love Divine, forever dear: Content to suffer, while we know, Living and dying, Thou art near!
Woe to the unlucky man who as a child is taught, even as a portion of his creed, what his grown reason must forswear.
Just are the ways of Heaven: from Heaven proceed The woes of man; Heaven doom'd the Greeks to bleed,— A theme of future song!
The idea of the "job" as the answer to all woes, individual and social, is one of the most pernicious myths of modern society.
Nor peace nor ease the heart can know Which, like the needle true, Turns at the touch of joy or woe, But turning, trembles too.
Nor ease nor peace that heart can know, That like the needle true, Turns at the touch of joy or woe; But turning, trembles too.
Social influence
• Mrs. Greville, Prayer for Indifference. Same idea in Bishop Leighton's Works.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Social influence" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 391-93.)
A wave do ye displace, A shield do ye extend To the travelling woe, And violent exertion through grief. And inflaming through fury Between heaven and earth.
This world is all a fleeting show, For man's illusion given; The smiles of joy, the tears of woe, Deceitful shine, deceitful flow,— There's nothing true but Heaven.
Pride takes such natural possession of us in the midst of our woes, errors, etc. We even lose our life with joy, provided people talk of it. 153
The crowd that thronged Ayodhyá wept, With agonizing woe distressed. With him in hermít's mantle dressed In guise of Sítá Lakshmí went, And none his glory may prevent.
Go your way. Forget Prometheus, And all the woe that he is doom'd to bear; By his own choice this vile estate preferring To ignorant bliss and unfelt slavery.
The gazing crowd, of glittering State afraid, Adore the Power their coward meanness made; In war's short intervals, while regal shows Still blind their reason and insult their woes.
In spring's own country, where the gardens blow, You faded, tender rose! For hours now past, Like butterflies departing, on you're cast The worms of memories to work you woe.
When, like the rising day, Eileen Aroon! Love sends his early ray, Eileen Aroon! What makes his dawning glow Changeless through joy and woe? Only the constant know!— Eileen Aroon!
For a tear is an intellectual thing; And a sigh is the sword of an angel-king; And the bitter groan of a martyr's woe Is an arrow from the Almighty's bow.
Martyrdom
• William Blake, The Grey Monk.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Martyrdom" (Sourced, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 495.)
The girl's mouth was chapped, tight and pinched, her skin dry. Mama would say she looked woebegone, but as Bird looked at her eyes, the word she thought of was desperate.
Like Andromach, Hector's wife, Was weary of her life, When she had lost her joy, Noble Hector of Troy; In like manner alsó Increaseth my deadly woe, For my sparrow is go.
The sun was set; the night came on apace, And falling dews bewet around the place; The bat takes airy rounds on leathern wings, And the hoarse owl his woeful dirges sings.
Bats
• John Gay, Shepherd's Week, Wednesday; or, The Dumps.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Bats" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 57.)
And from the prayer of Want, and plaint of Woe, O never, never turn away thine ear! Forlorn, in this bleak wilderness below, Ah! what were man, should Heaven refuse to hear!
Prayer
• James Beattie, The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), Book I, Stanza 29.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Prayer" (Quotes: Alphabetized by author , Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 625-29.)
Ah, were she pitiful as she is fair, Or but as mild as she is seeming so, Then were my hopes greater than my despair, Then all the world were heaven, nothing woe.
Come, Sleep: O Sleep! the certain knot of peace, The baiting place of wit, the balm of woe, The poor man's wealth, the prisoner's release, Th' indifferent judge between the high and low.
Sleep
• Sir Philip Sidney, Astrophel and Stella, Stanza 39.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Sleep" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 716-21.)
SHAKOONTALÁ: [Aside] Woe! woe! Is our very marriage to be called in question by my own husband? Ah me! is this to be the end of all my bright visions of wedded happiness?
Masters, I have to tell a tale of woe, A tale of folly and of wasted life, Hope against hope, the bitter dregs of strife, Ending, where all things end, in death at last.
If I should die to-night And you should come in deepest grief and woe— And say:—"Here's that ten dollars that I owe," I might arise in my large white cravat And say, "What's that?"
The fittest for my Wound; Who best the gentle Passions knows to move; '''''Ovid, the soft Philosopher of Love''': His Love Epistles'' for my Friends I chose; For there I found the Kindred of my Woes.
To primitive man thinking was even more unpalatable than it is to the modern Christians. He did it badly, as they do, and his brief experience of it had taught him that it brought only woe.
Kings will shudder [that] day, Woe awaits them! When the recompenser shall appear, Let the heaven appear below. A ruddy wind will be brought Out to the cinder, Until the world is as desolate As when created.
Of all The fools who flock'd to swell or see the show Who car'd about the corpse? The funeral Made the attraction, and the black the woe; There throbb'd not there a thought which pierc'd the pall.
Grave (burial)
• Lord Byron, Vision of Judgment, Stanza 10.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Grave (burial)" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 337-40.)
And hapless Tara sank below The whelming waters of her woe, Looked upon Bali's face and fell Beside him whom she loved so well, Like a young creeper clinging round - A tall tree prostrate on the ground.
Tara (Ramayana)
• In: p. 119.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Tara (Ramayana)" (Quotes, The Rámáyaṇ of Vālmīki Translated Into English Verse by Ralph T. H. Griffith: IV, Volume 4: Valmiki in: ''[http://books.google.com/books?id=Un1cAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA92 The Rámáyaṇ of Vālmīki Translated Into English Verse by Ralph T. H. Griffith: IV, Volume 4]'', Trübner, 1873)
Oh, when a mother meets on high The babe she lost in infancy, Hath she not then for pains and fears, The day of woe, the watchful night, For all her sorrow, all her tears, An over-payment of delight?
Most of us are called on to perform tasks far beyond what we believe we can do. Our capabilities seldom match our aspirations, and we are often woefully unprepared. To this extent, we are all Assistant Pig-Keepers at heart.
Rippling through thy branches goes the sunshine, Among thy leaves that palpitate forever, And in thee, a pining nymph had prisoned The soul, once of some tremulous inland river, Quivering to tell her woe, but ah! dumb, dumb forever.
Trees
• James Russell Lowell, The Birch Tree, reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 70.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Trees" (Quotes, Specific types, Birch (Betula))
King: Ah! woe is me! when I forsook my wife— My lawful wife—concealed within her breast There lay my second self, a child unborn, Hope of my race, e'en as the choicest fruit Lies hidden in the bosom of the earth.
King, tried in fires of woe! Men hunger for thy grace: And through the night I go, Loving thy mournful face. Yet, when the city sleeps; When all the cries are still: The stars and heavenly deeps Work out a perfect will.
Not in the time of pleasure Hope doth set her bow; But in the sky of sorrow, Over the vale of woe. Through gloom and shadow look we On beyond the years! The soul would have no rainbow Had the eyes no tears.
Social woes have been on the rise over the past years. I do believe that the only way to resolve these problems is decentralisation. Our problems will not be resolved as long as only the government is in charge of our cultural affairs.
The Raven's house is built with reeds,— Sing woe, and alas is me! And the Raven's couch is spread with weeds, High on the hollow tree; And the Raven himself, telling his beads In penance for his past misdeeds, Upon the top I see.
Ravens
• Thomas D'Arcy McGee, The Penitent Raven; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 656.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Ravens" (Sourced)
Africa does not have an uncle abroad who will come to bail it out of its political and economic woes. It is important that African countries wake up and pool whatever resources they have and jointly deal elements pulling our continent down a death blow.
We live in a global economy, but the political organization of our global society is woefully inadequate. We are bereft of the capacity to preserve peace and to counteract the excesses of the financial markets. Without these controls, the global economy, is liable to break down
The Church owns property, needs income, employs men, works on human material, and banks on its moral prestige. Its present efficiency and future standing are bound up for weal or woe with the social welfare of the people and with the outcome of the present struggle.
We live in a global economy, but the political organization of our global society is woefully inadequate. We are bereft of the capacity to preserve peace and to counteract the excesses of the financial markets. Without these controls, the global economy, is liable to break down.
World economy
• George Soros, The Crisis of Global Capitalism (1998).
• Source: Wikiquote: "World economy" (Quotes: Quotes are arranged alphabetically by author, S - Z)
I ask not how remote the day Nor what the sinner's woe Before their dross is purged away, Enough for me to know That when the cup of wrath is drained, The metal purified, They'll cling to what they once disdained, And live by Him that died.
No radiant pearl which crested Fortune wears, No gem that twinkling hangs from Beauty’s ears, Not the bright stars which Night’s blue arch adorn, Nor rising suns that gild the vernal morn, Shine with such lustre as the tear that flows Down Virtue’s manly cheek for others’ woes.
No radiant pearl, which crested Fortune wears, No gem that twinkling hangs from Beauty's ears, Not the bright stars which Night's blue arch adorn, Nor rising suns that gild the vernal morn, Shine with such lustre as the tear that flows Down Virtue's manly cheek for others' woes.
Tears
• Erasmus Darwin, The Botanic Garden, Part II, Canto III, line 459.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Tears" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 780-83.)
Jason types the nursery rhyme "Mary Had a Little Lamb" into the word processor as "Marry hat hey lid tell lam, ids fleas woes wide has know." He runs the spell checker, which finds no errors. Jason: [To Peter] If you ever want to feel superior to a computer...
Chorus of Rishis Ten-headed Ravan! beware, beware, How even in a dream thou ventures! there; 'Tis the land mysterious of those that mourn: On the wings of the wind thou thither may'st go, But woe for Mandodari! O woe ! Canst thou, wilt thou safe return ? Ah no!
Mandodari
• Source: Wikiquote: "Mandodari" (Quotes, A Mystery: Anon in: A Mystery, (Reprinted from “The Dublin University Magazine”, 1853 & 1854}, The Theosophical Publishing Society )
Condemn'd whole years in absence to deplore, And image charms he must behold no more, Such if there be, who loves so long, so well; Let him our sad, our tender story tell; The well-sung woes will sooth my pensive ghost; He best can paint them, who shall feel them most.
Eloisa to Abelard
• Lines 361-366; The last line here is probably inspired by that Joseph Addison in The Campaign (1704): "And those that paint them truest praise them most".
• Source: Wikiquote: "Eloisa to Abelard" (Quotes)
Then Ruma his devoted wife For her dead lord will leave her life, And Tara, widowed and forlorn, Will die in anguish, sorrow-worn. On Angad too the blow will fall Killing the hope and joy of all. The ruin of their prince and king The V6nars' souls with woe will ring.
Tara (Ramayana)
• In: p. 314.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Tara (Ramayana)" (Quotes, The Rámáyaṇ of Vālmīki Translated Into English Verse by Ralph T. H. Griffith: IV, Volume 4: Valmiki in: ''[http://books.google.com/books?id=Un1cAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA92 The Rámáyaṇ of Vālmīki Translated Into English Verse by Ralph T. H. Griffith: IV, Volume 4]'', Trübner, 1873)
In Greek fable, as in Christian, it is asserted that there is a forbidden knowledge which brings nothing into world but woe. Our generation has had ample demonstration of what that knowledge is. It is knowledge of the useful rather than the true and the good, of techniques rather than of ends.
Monday's child is fair in face, Tuesday's child is full of grace, Wednesday's child is full of woe, Thursday's child has far to go, Friday's child is loving and giving, Saturday's child works hard for its living; And a child that's born on a Christmas day, Is fair and wise, good and gay.
Children
• Anonymous; reported in Traditions, Legends, Superstitions, and Sketches of Devonshire (1838), by Anna E. K. S. Bray, vol. 2, pp. 287–88. In some versions, "the Sabbath day" is substituted for "a Christmas day". For further information and other alternative wordings, see Monday's Child.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Children" (Quotes: Alphabetized by author )
A civil sword (as woeful experience in all ages has proved) is so far from bringing or helping forward an opposite in religion to repentance that magistrates sin grievously against the work of God and blood of souls by such proceedings... Religion cannot be true which needs such instruments of violence to uphold it so.
Slobodan Milošević, more than anyone else, caused a division within the Left and Centre Left, dividing the pacifists, anti-imperialists and anti-Americans from the anti-fascists and the internationalists. He reminded too many of us that inaction can be as toxic and murderous as action. He prepared us - for weal or woe - for the new world.
Yes, let the Angel blow! A peal from the parted heaven, The first of seven!— The warning, not yet the sign, of woe! That men arise And look about them with wakened eyes, Behold on their garments the dust and slime, Refrain, forbear, Accept the weight of a nobler care And take reproach from the fallen time!
The Spice-Tree lives in the garden green, Beside it the fountain flows; And a fair Bird sits the boughs between, And sings his melodious woes. * * * * * * That out-bound stem has branches three; On each a thousand blossoms grow; And old as aught of time can be, The root stands fast in the rocks below.
You experts in the law, woe to you, because you load people down with burdens they can hardly carry, and you yourselves will not lift one finger to help them. ... Woe to you experts in the law, because you have taken away the key to knowledge. You yourselves have not entered, and you have hindered those who were entering.
I am not old, — I cannot be old, Though threescore years and ten Have wasted away, like a tale that is told, The lives of other men: I am not old ; though friends and foes Alike have gone to their graves, And left me alone to my joys or my woes, As a rock in the midst of the waves.
Ah, not to a blaze of light I go, Nor shouts of a triumph train; I go down to kiss the dregs of woe, And drink up the Cup of Pain. And whether a scaffold or crucifix waits 'Neath the light of my silver star, I know and I care not: I only know I shall pause not though it be far.
Have you, with your work, made anyone glow? Erupted their sorrow? Evicted their woe? Have you been anyone's consolation through a night? Have you evoked unrehearsed emotion? Chiseled a crack in someone's encasement and watched them escape? Followed the muses wherever they led? Kept on creating when left for dead? Do not bother me with punctuation until you have earned your degree.
Vanna Bonta
• "To Some Critics"
• Source: Wikiquote: "Vanna Bonta" (Quotes, Degrees: Thought Capsules and Micro Tales (1989): Degrees: Thought Capsules (Poems and Micro Tales on Life, Death, Man, Woman, & Art], Dora Books, September 1, 1989)
Hark! hark! – What mean those yells – those cries? His chain some furious madman breaks! He comes! I see his glaring eyes! Now! now! my dungeon bars he shakes. Help! Help! He's gone! Oh! fearful woe, Such screams to hear – such sights to see! My brain! my brain! – I know, I know I am not mad, but soon shall be.
Labor is rest—from the sorrows that greet us; Rest from all petty vexations that meet us, Rest from sin-promptings that ever entreat us, Rest from the world-sirens that hire us to ill. Work—and pure slumbers shall wait on thy pillow; Work—thou shalt ride over Care's coming billow; Lie not down wearied 'neath Woe's weeping willow! Work with a stout heart and resolute will!
Labor
• Frances S. Osgood, To Labor is to Pray.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Labor" (Quotes, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 423-25.)
Gather up your bundle from the ground, O woman dwelling under siege. For this is what Jehovah says: “Here I am hurling the inhabitants out of the land at this time, And I will cause them to experience distress.” Woe to me because of my breakdown! My wound is incurable. And I said: “Surely this is my sickness, and I must bear it.
Plainly he was one of those rare people who burn with an inner fire—but the inner fire that never failed in James Arm-of-the-Lord was a brand of woe and a torch of terror to the Unrighteous. Nor was it lessened by the fact that the ranks of the Unrighteous, in James’ estimation, included all those whose opinions in any way differed from his own.
Prostrate on earth the bleeding warrior lies, And Isr'el's beauty on the mountains dies. How are the mighty fallen! Hush'd be my sorrow, gently fall my tears, Lest my sad tale should reach the alien's ears: Bid Fame be dumb, and tremble to proclaim In heathen Gath, or Ascalon, our shame Lest proud Philistia, lest our haughty foe, With impious scorn insult our solemn woe.
Soldiers
• William Somervile, The Lamentation of David over Saul and Jonathan.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Soldiers" (Sourced, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 725-29.)
Apart from the positive woes of perdition, an eternity of wretchedness grows from the want of love to Christ as naturally as the oak grows from the acorn, or the harvest from the scattered grain. It is not that love to Christ merits heaven; it does far better, it makes heaven. It is, as it were, the organ of sensation that takes note of heaven's blessedness.
His reasoning had been introverted, turned from an examination of men as mammals and devoted to a sorrow that sinful and aching souls should not more readily seek the security of a mystic process known as Conviction, Repentance, and Salvation, which he was assured by the noblest and most literate men he had ever known, was guaranteed to cure all woe. His own experience did not absolutely confirm this.
SECOND MAXIM.—We never pity another's woes unless we know we may suffer in like manner ourselves. Why have kings no pity on their people? Because they never expect to be ordinary men. Why are the rich so hard on the poor? Because they have no fear of becoming poor. Why do the nobles look down upon the people? Because a nobleman will never be one of the lower classes.
The Philistine … strictly separates “the earnestness of life” (under which term he understands his calling, his business, and his wife and child) from … trivialities, and among the latter he includes all things which have any relation to culture. Therefore, woe to the art that takes itself seriously, that has a notion of what it may exact, and that dares to endanger his income, his business, and his habits!
Philistinism
• Friedrich Nietzsche, Untimely Meditations, A. Ludovici, trans., “David Strauss,” § 1.2, p. 18
• Source: Wikiquote: "Philistinism" (Sourced, Nineteenth century)
It is required of every man … that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellowmen, and travel far and wide; and if that spirit goes not forth in life, it is condemned to do so after death. It is doomed to wander through the world — oh, woe is me! — and witness what it cannot share, but might have shared on earth, and turned to happiness!
I speak of the war as fruitless; for it is clear that, prosecuted upon the basis of the proclamations of September 22d and September 24th, 1862, prosecuted, as I must understand these proclamations, to say nothing of the kindred blood which has followed, upon the theory of emancipation, devastation, subjugation, it cannot fail to be fruitless in every thing except the harvest of woe which it is ripening for what was once the peerless republic.
Worry for others— it does no good in the end. The great Dao, all amid joy, is reborn. In a joyous state, ruler and subject accord, In a joyous home, father and son get along. If brothers increase their joy, the world will flourish. If husband and wife have joy, it's worthy of song. What guest and host can bear a lack of joy? Both high and low, in joy, lose their woe before long. Ha ha ha.
Hanshan
• Translated by Mary Jacob Note: The following three poems are examples of Han-shan's three word per line poems. They are literal translations, word for word, and illustrate a simple childlike side of the old poet:
• Source: Wikiquote: "Hanshan" (Quotes)
Everyone agrees that world events are FRIGHTENING! There are wars, famines, plagues, wild weather, diseases, earthquakes, and financial woes everywhere! The world is in a MESS! Everyone seems to be watching, waiting and praying for someone-ANYONE to come and FIX THE WORLD'S PROBLEMS and “take over the world!” WHO can possibly fix this CHAOS? The Bible has the ONLY real answer. God created the world, He knows how it is SUPPOSED to run and HE alone can fix it!
According to Woese's evolutionary tree, the most primary of the present-day bacteria lie within a group called the archaebacteria. All archaebacteria thrive in intense heat... Woese believes that that these modern species evolved from a similar type of ancient bacteria that... may have drawn its energy from the sulfurous compounds spewing out of hydrothermal vents. If that's true, the bacteria seen at vents today could be the closest descendents we know of the original forms of life on earth.
The accent of conviction is made up of a mixture of faith, power, and love combined, forming a characteristic which is at once simple, pious, and grand, redolent of inspiration and sanctity. Here are no fabulous joys and woes; no hollow, fantastic sentimentalities; no wire-drawn refinings, either in thought or feeling; the passion that is traced before us has glowed in a living heart; the opinion he utters has risen in his own understanding, and'been a light to his own steps.
Preaching
• Thomas Carlyle, p. 479.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Preaching" (Sourced, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895): Quotes reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895).)
The press, many-tongued, surpassed itself in reproaches upon these women who had so far departed from their sphere as to speak in public. But, with anointed lips and a consecration which put even life itself at stake, these peerless women pursued the even tenor of their way, saying to their opponents only: "Woe is me, if I preach not this gospel of freedom for the slave." Over all came the melody of Whittier's "When woman's heart is breaking Shall woman's voice be hushed? "
Lucy Stone
• Source: Wikiquote: "Lucy Stone" (Quotes, The Progress of Fifty Years (1893): Her last public speech, to the Congress of Women at the Woman's Building of the World's Columbian Exposition (World's Fair), Chicago, Illinois.)
The whole history of lamentation, and mourning, and woe, from the beginning of the world—the funeral ceremonies in which the living symbolize the intensity of their grief—the monuments they rear to tell the world for centuries to come of the calamity they have suffered from the stroke of death—are enduring attestations that it is not so much in the removal of one sentient and living being off the earth, as in the change—the calamitous change to the survivors—that death is truly the King of Terrors.
Seems, madam! Nay, it is; I know not "seems." 'Tis not alone my inky cloak, good mother, Nor customary suits of solemn black, Nor windy suspiration of forced breath. No, nor the fruitful river in the eye, Nor the dejected 'haviour of the visage, Together with all forms, modes, shapes of grief, That can denote me truly; these indeed seem, For they are actions that a man might play, But I have that within which passeth show; These but the trappings and the suits of woe.
Mourning
• William Shakespeare, Hamlet (1600-02), Act I, scene 2. ("Moods" for "modes" in folio and quarto).
• Source: Wikiquote: "Mourning" (Sourced)
In the beginning the Gods made man, and fashioned the sky and the sea, And the earth's fair face for man's dwelling-place, and this was the Gods' decree: — "Lo, We have given to man five wits: he discerneth folly and sin; He is swift to deride all the world outside, and blind to the world within: So that man may make sport and amuse Us, in battling for phrases or pelf, Now that each may know what forebodeth woe to his neighbor, and not to himself."
Nay, 'tis not fitting that we should require Within this World but Raiment, Food and Fire; Powerless Atoms of Eternity Why should we hope to know of Something higher? This Knowledge could but add, not lessen. Woe; The Magian who To-day forms fire with snow Shares with the Sudra in Infinity. We come from Nothing and to Nothing go. So best consent, although with forced grace, Upon this dingy Ball to run our race Untrammeled with the thoughts of higher things, Until we reach the shadowy Stopping place.
What then? For all my sins, His pardoning grace; For all my wants and woes, His loving-kindness; For darkest shades, the shining of God's face; And Christ's own hand to lead me in my blindness. When Caesar gave one a great reward, "This," said he, "is too great a gift for me to receive;" but said Caesar, "It is not too great a gift for me to give." So, though the least gift that Christ gives, in one sense, is too much for us to receive, yet the greatest gifts are not too great for Christ to give.
Musick has Charms to sooth a savage Breast, To soften Rocks, or bend a knotted Oak. I've read, that things inanimate have mov'd, And, as with living Souls, have been inform'd, By Magick Numbers and persuasive Sound. What then am I? Am I more senseless grown Than Trees, or Flint? O force of constant Woe! 'Tis not in Harmony to calm my Griefs. Anselmo sleeps, and is at Peace; last Night The silent Tomb receiv'd the good Old King; He and his Sorrows now are safely lodg'd Within its cold, but hospitable Bosom. Why am not I at Peace?
What had he learned? Enough Hebrew and Greek to be able to crawl through the Bible by using lexicons — so that, like all his classmates once they were out of the seminary, he always read it in English. A good many of the more condemnatory texts of the Bible — rather less than the average Holy Roller carpenter-evangelist. The theory that India and Africa have woes because they are not Christianized, but that Christianized Bangor and Des Moines have woes because the devil, a being obviously more potent than omnipotent God, sneaks around counteracting the work of Baptist preachers.
I am thankful to have borne a part in the emancipating labours of the last sixty years; but entirely uncertain how, had I now to begin my life, I could face the very different problems of the next sixty years. Of one thing I am, and always have been, convinced—it is not by the State that man can be regenerated, and the terrible woes of this darkened world effectually dealt with. In some, and some very important, respects, I yearn for the impossible revival of the men and the ideas of my first twenty years, which immediately followed the first Reform Act.
Joy comes, grief goes, we know not how; Everything is happy now, Everything is upward striving; 'Tis as easy now for the heart to be true As for grass to be green or skies to be blue,— 'Tis the natural way of living: Who knows whither the clouds have fled? In the unscarred heaven they leave no wake; And the eyes forget the tears they have shed, The heart forgets its sorrow and ache; The soul partakes the season's youth, And the sulphurous rifts of passion and woe Lie deep 'neath a silence pure and smooth, Like burnt-out craters healed with snow.
Love is not a feeling to pass away, Like the balmy breath of a summer day; It is not — it cannot be — laid aside; It is not a thing to forget or hide. It clings to the heart, ah, woe is me! As the ivy clings to the old oak tree. Love is not a passion of earthly mould, As a thirst for honour, or fame, or gold: For when all these wishes have died away, The deep strong love of a brighter day, Though nourished in secret, consumes the more, As the slow rust eats to the iron’s core.
I must continue to follow the path I take now. If I do nothing, if I study nothing, if I cease searching, then, woe is me, I am lost. That is how I look at it — keep going, keep going come what may. But what is your final goal, you may ask. That goal will become clearer, will emerge slowly but surely, much as the rough draught turns into a sketch, and the sketch into a painting through the serious work done on it, through the elaboration of the original vague idea and through the consolidation of the first fleeting and passing thought.
Almost the only persons who may be said to comprehend even approximately the significance, principles, and purposes of Socialism are the chief leaders of the extreme wings of the Socialistic forces, and perhaps a few of the money kings themselves. It is a subject of which it has lately become quite the fashion for preacher, professor, and penny-a-liner to treat, and, for the most part, woeful work they have made with it, exciting the derision and pity of those competent to judge. That those prominent in the intermediate Socialistic divisions do not fully understand what they are about is evident from the positions they occupy.
Woe to the person who wants to be excused from suffering! That apostolic expression does not indicate only the forsakenness, the suffering of separation, which is even more terrible than the separation of death, since, death only separates a person from the temporal and therefore is a release, whereas this separation shuts him out from the eternal and therefore is an imprisonment that again leaves the spirit sighing in the fragile earthen vessel, in the cramped space, in the status of an alien, because the home of the spirit is in the eternal and the infinite. Four Upbuilding Discourses, 1844 p. 337 (Eighteen Upbuilding Discourses)
The Lamb is, indeed, the emblem of love; but what so terrible as the wrath of the Lamb? The depth of the mercy despised is the measure of the punishment of him that despiseth. No more fearful words than those of the Saviour. The threatenings of the law were temporal, those of the gospel are eternal. It is Christ who reveals the never-dying worm, the unquenchable fire, and He who contrasts with the eternal joys of the redeemed the everlasting woes of the lost. His loving arms would enfold the whole human race, but not while impenitent or unbelieving; the benefits of His redemption are conditional.
Hell
• Edward Thomson, p. 311.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Hell" (Quotes: Alphabetized by author or source, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895): Quotes reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895).)
Though we, by the wrath and the contrariness that is in us, be now in tribulation, distress, and woe, as falleth to our blindness and frailty, yet are we securely safe by the merciful keeping of God, that we perish not. But we are not blissfully safe, in having of our endless joy, till we be all in peace and in love: that is to say, full pleased with God and with all His works, and with all His judgments, and loving and peaceable with our self and with our even-Christians and with all that God loveth, as love beseemeth. And this doeth God’s Goodness in us.
Ever the more clearly that the soul seeth this Blissful Cheer by grace of loving, the more it longeth to see it in fulness. For notwithstanding that our Lord God dwelleth in us and is here with us, and albeit He claspeth us and encloseth us for tender love that He may never leave us, and is more near to us than tongue can tell or heart can think, yet may we never stint of moaning nor of weeping nor of longing till when we see Him clearly in His Blissful Countenance. For in that precious blissful sight there may no woe abide, nor any weal fail.
You know, as God does, how I went about among you from my youth in the faith of truth and in sincerity of heart. As well as to the heathen among whom I live, I have shown them trust and always show them trust. God knows I did not cheat any one of them, nor consider it, for the sake of God and his Church, lest I arouse them and [bring about] persecution for them and for all of us, and lest the Lord's name be blasphemed because of me, for it is written: 'Woe to the men through whom the name of the Lord is blasphemed.'
The Lamb is, indeed, the emblem of love; but what so terrible as the wrath of the Lamb? The depth of the mercy despised is the measure of the punishment of him that despiseth. No more fearful words than those of the Saviour. The threat- enings of the law were temporal, those of the gospel are eternal. It is Christ who reveals the never-dying worm, the unquenchable fire, and He who contrasts with the eternal joys of the redeemed the everlasting woes of the lost. His loving arms would enfold the whole human race, but not while impenitent or unbelieving; the benefits of His redemption are conditional.
Edward Thomson
• P. 311.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Edward Thomson" (Sourced, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895): Quotes reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895).)
This word: Thou shalt not be overcome, was said full clearly and full mightily, for assuredness and comfort against all tribulations that may come. He said not: Thou shalt not be tempested, thou shalt not be travailed, thou shalt not be afflicted; but He said: Thou shalt not be overcome. God willeth that we take heed to these words, and that we be ever strong in sure trust, in weal and woe. For He loveth and enjoyeth us, and so willeth He that we love and enjoy Him and mightily trust in Him; and all shall be well. And soon after, all was close and I saw no more.
Somewhat musing And more mourning, In remembering Th’unsteadfastness; This world being Of such wheeling, Me contrarying, What may I guess?I fear, doubtless, Remediless Is now to seize My woeful chance; For unkindness, Withoutenless, And no redress, Me doth advance.With displeasure, To my grievance, And no surance Of remedy; Lo, in this trance, Now in substance, Such is my dance, Willing to die.Methinks truly Bounden am I, And that greatly, To be content; Seeing plainly Fortune doth wry All contrary From mine intent.My life was lent Me to one intent. It is nigh spent. Welcome Fortune! But I ne went Thus to be shent But she it meant: Such is her won.
More than one reader will reproach me no doubt for departing from my first intention and forgetting the lasting happiness I promised my pupil. The sorrowful, the dying, such sights of pain and woe, what happiness, what delight is this for a young heart on the threshold of life? His gloomy tutor, who proposed to give him such a pleasant education, only introduces him to life that he may suffer. This is what they will say, but what do I care? I promised to make him happy, not to make him seem happy. Am I to blame if, deceived as usual by the outward appearances, you take them for the reality?
It is more blissful that man be taken from pain, than that pain be taken from man; for if pain be taken from us it may come again: therefore it is a sovereign comfort and blissful beholding in a loving soul that we shall be taken from pain. For in this behest I saw a marvellous compassion that our Lord hath in us for our woe, and a courteous promising of clear deliverance. For He willeth that we be comforted in the overpassing; and that He shewed in these words: And thou shalt come up above, and thou shalt have me to thy meed, and thou shalt be fulfilled of joy and bliss.
But here shewed our courteous Lord the moaning and the mourning of the soul, signifying thus: I know well thou wilt live for my love, joyously and gladly suffering all the penance that may come to thee; but in as much as thou livest not without sin thou wouldest suffer, for my love, all the woe, all the tribulation and distress that might come to thee. And it is sooth. But be not greatly aggrieved with sin that falleth to thee against thy will.'' And here I understood that that the Lord beholdeth the servant with pity and not with blame. For this passing life asketh not to live all without blame and sin.
I don't know what this so-called pure gospel is. Was the preaching of John the Baptist pure? He did not say only, "Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand!" (Matthew 3:2). He also "rebuked [Herod]...for all the evils which Herod had done" (Luke 3:19). He was beheaded because he didn't confine himself to abstract teaching. Jesus did not preach only the "pure" Sermon on the Mount, but also what some actual church leaders would have called a negative sermon: "Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites!...Serpents, brood of vipers!" (Matthew 23:27,33). It is for such "impure" preaching that He was crucified. The Pharisees would not have bothered about the Sermon on the Mount.
When and under what conditions is the black man to have a free ballot? When is he in fact to have those full civil rights which have so long been his in law? When is that equality of influence which our form of government was intended to secure to the electors to be restored? This generation should courageously face these grave questions, and not leave them as a heritage of woe to the next. The consultation should proceed with candor, calmness, and great patience, upon the lines of justice and humanity, not of prejudice and cruelty. No question in our country can be at rest except upon the firm base of justice and of the law.
When the movement of the comets is considered and we reflect on the laws of gravity, it will be readily perceived that their approach to Earth might there cause the most woeful events, bring back the deluge, or make it perish in a deluge of fire, shatter it into small dust, or at least turn it from its orbit, drive away its Moon, or, still worse, the Earth itself outside the orbit of Saturn, and inflict upon us a winter several centuries long, which neither men nor animals would be able to bear. The tails even of comets would not be unimportant phenomena, if in taking their departure left them in whole or part in our atmosphere
A Voice[Durvasa]: Woe to thee, maiden, for daring to slight a guest like me! Shall I stand here unwelcomed—even I, A very mine of penitential merit, Worthy of all respect? Shalt thou, rash maid, Thus set at nought the ever sacred ties Of hospitality? and fix thy thoughts Upon the cherished object of thy love, While I am present? Thus I curse thee, then— He, even he of whom thou thinkest, he Shall think no more of thee; nor in his heart Retain thine image. Vainly shalt thou strive To waken his remembrance of the past; He shall disown thee, even as the sot, Roused from his midnight drunkenness, denies The words he uttered in his revellings.
Woe unto thee, Chorazin! woe unto thee, Bethsaida! for if the mighty works, which were done in you, had been done in Tyre and Sidon, they would have repented long ago in sackcloth and ashes. But I say unto you, It shall be more tolerable for Tyre and Sidon at the day of judgment, than for you. And thou, Capernaum, which art exalted unto heaven, shalt be brought down to hell: for if the mighty works, which have been done in thee, had been done in Sodom, it would have remained until this day. But I say unto you, That it shall be more tolerable for the land of Sodom in the day of judgment, than for thee.
When the loud day for men who sow and reap Grows still, and on the silence of the town The insubstantial veils of night and sleep, The meed of the day's labour, settle down, Then for me in the stillness of the night The wasting, watchful hours drag on their course, And in the idle darkness comes the bite Of all the burning serpents of remorse; Dreams seethe; and fretful infelicities Are swarming in my over-burdened soul, And Memory before my wakeful eyes With noiseless hand unwinds her lengthy scroll. Then, as with loathing I peruse the years, I tremble, and I curse my natal day, Wail bitterly, and bitterly shed tears, But cannot wash the woeful script away.
Rabbi Elazar, son of Rabbi Shimon, says, ‘Since the world is judged by its majority, and the individual is judged by the majority, if he performs one Mitzva, happy is he, for he has sentenced himself and the whole world to a scale of merit. If he commits one sin, woe unto him, for he has sentenced himself and the whole world to a scale of sin.’ (...) Moreover, it is written, “one sinner destroyeth much good.” This is because one sin sentences the person and the entire world to a scale of sin.    - Rabbi Yehuda Ashlag, "Introduction to the Study of the Ten Sefirot", in Kabbalah for the Student, Michael Laitman, ed., Laitman Kabbalah Publishers, 2008, p. 355.
This Vision was shewed me, according to mine understanding, that it is speedful to some souls to feel on this wise: sometime to be in comfort, and sometime to fail and to be left to themselves. God willeth that we know that He keepeth us even alike secure in woe and in weal. And for profit of man’s soul, a man is sometime left to himself; although sin is not always the cause: for in this time I sinned not wherefore I should be left to myself — for it was so sudden. Also I deserved not to have this blessed feeling. But freely our Lord giveth when He will; and suffereth us in woe sometime. And both is one love.
And you, amiable debauchees, you who since youth have known no limits but those of your desires and who have been governed by your caprices alone, study the cynical Dolmancé, proceed like him and go as far as he if you too would travel the length of those flowered ways your lechery prepares for you; in Dolmancé's academy be at last convinced it is only by exploring and enlarging the sphere of his tastes and whims, it is only by sacrificing everything to the senses' pleasure that this individual, who never asked to be cast into this universe of woe, that this poor creature who goes under the name of Man, may be able to sow a smattering of roses atop the thorny path of life.
Thus in the time of our pain and our woe He sheweth us Cheer of His Passion and His Cross, helping us to bear it by His own blessed virtue. And in the time of our sinning He sheweth to us Cheer of Ruth and Pity, mightily keeping us and defending us against all our enemies. And these be the common Cheer which He sheweth to us in this life; therewith mingling the third: and that is His Blissful Cheer, like, in part, as it shall be in Heaven. And that by gracious touching and sweet lighting of the spiritual life, whereby that we are kept in sure faith, hope, and charity, with contrition and devotion, and also with contemplation and all manner of true solace and sweet comforts.
Everyone who wishes to help bring the world out of the economic woes will line up to get a chip implanted! It's safe, simple and already available. It's been tested on animals for years. One little chip under the skin and everyone can be identified and conduct business electronically! No more theft, bad checks, waiting for checks to clear, stolen credit cards, armored cars, stolen ID, waiting lines at stores or airports, etc. Just little archways to walk through that can quickly scan who you are and automatically deduct the “cash” from your account or verify your identity! Simple! Anyone who resists this “obvious solution” will be an enemy of the state. Oh, and one more minor insignificant thing. No more privacy or independence. Big brother will be watching everything.
It appears that mankind in this life are not agents of trial for eternity, but that they will eternally remain agents of trial. To suppose that our eternal circumstances will be unalterably fixed in happiness or misery, in consequence of the agency or transactions of this temporary life, is inconsistent with the moral government of God, and the progressive and retrospective knowledge of the human mind. God has not put it into our power to plunge ourselves into eternal woe and perdition; human liberty is not so extensive, for the term of human life bears no proportion to eternity succeeding it; so that there could be no proportion between a momentary agency, (which is liberty of action,) or probation, and any supposed eternal consequences of happiness or misery resulting from it.
He who walks through a great city to find subjects for weeping, may, God knows, find plenty at every corner to wring his heart; but let such a man walk on his course, and enjoy his grief alone — we are not of those who would accompany him. The miseries of us poor earthdwellers gain no alleviation from the sympathy of those who merely hunt them out to be pathetic over them. The weeping philosopher too often impairs his eyesight by his woe, and becomes unable from his tears to see the remedies for the evils which he deplores. Thus it will often be found that the man of no tears is the truest philanthropist, as he is the best physician who wears a cheerful face, even in the worst of cases.
Postumus was clever: he guessed that this would make Cato angry enough to forget himself. And Cato rose to the bait, shouting out with a string of old-fashioned curses that in the days of his ancestor, whose memory this stammering imp was insulting, woe betide any child who failed in reverence to his elders; for they dealt out discipline with a heavy hand in those days. Whereas in these degenerate times the leading men of Rome gave any ignorant oafish lout (this was for Postumus) or any feeble-minded decrepit-limbed little whippersnapper (this was for me) full permission— Postumus interrupted with a warning smile: "So I was right. The degenerate Augustus insults the great Censor by employing you in his degenerate family. I suppose you have told the Lady Livia just how you feel about things?"
But O Sarina come with me to my bed of woes, let me love you gently in the night, long time, we got all night, till dawn, till Juliet's rising sun and Romeo's vial sink, till I have slaked my thirst of Samsara at your portal rosy petal lips and left saviour juice in your rosy flesh garden to melt and dry and ululate another baby for the void, come sweet Sarina in my naughty arms, be dirty in my clean milk, and I'll detest the defecate I leave in your milky empowered cyst-and-vulva chamber, your cloacan clara file-hool through which slowly drool the hall-gyzm, to castles in your hassel flesh and I'll protect you trembling thighs against my heart and kiss your lips and cheeks and Lair and love you everywhere and that'll be that...
We must all learn two lessons – the lesson of self-help and the lesson of giving to and receiving help from our brother. There is not a man who does not sometimes slip, who does not sometimes need a helping hand; and woe to him who, when the chance comes, fails to stretch out that helping hand. Yet, though each man can and ought thus be helped at times, he is lost beyond redemption if he becomes so dependent upon outside help that he feels that his own exertions are secondary. Any man at times will stumble, and it is then our duty to lift him up and set him on his feet again; but no man can be permanently carried, for if he expects to be carried he shows that he is not worth carrying.
His greatest virtue was following through but fate could grant him only that rare and tragic greatness of dying in armed defence of an anachronistic booby of bourgeois law, defending a Supreme Court of Justice that had repudiated him but would legitimise his murderers, defending a miserable Congress that had declared him illegitimate but which was to bend complacently before the will of the usurpers, defending the freedom of opposition parties that had sold their souls to fascism, defending the whole moth-eaten paraphernalia of a shitty system that he had proposed abolishing but without a shot being fired. The drama took place in Chile, to the greater woe of the Chileans, but it will pass into history as something that has happened to us all, children of this age, and it will remain in our lives for ever.
When published in 1981, The Mismeasure of Man was immediately hailed as a masterwork, the ringing answer to those who would classify people, rank them according to their supposed genetic gifts and limits. And yet the idea of innate limits—of biology as destiny—dies hard, as witness the attention devoted to The Bell Curve, whose arguments are here so effectively anticipated and thoroughly undermined by Stephen Jay Gould. In this [second] edition Dr. Gould traces the subsequent history of the controversy on innateness right through The Bell Curve. Further, he has added five essays, in a separate section at the end, on questions of The Bell Curve in particular and on race, racism, and biological determinism in general. These additions strengthen the claim of this book to be “a major contribution toward deflating pseudobiological ‘explanations’ of our present social woes.”
Oh ! what a frightful business is this modern society; the race for wealth — wealth. I am ashamed to write the word. Wealth means well-being, weal, the opposite of woe. And is that money? or can money buy it? We boast much of the purity of our faith, of the sins of idolatry among the Romanists, and we send missionaries to the poor unenlightened heathens, to bring them out of their darkness into our light, our glorious light; but oh! if you may measure the fearfulness of an idol by the blood which stains its sacrifice, by the multitude of its victims, where in all the world, in the fetish of the poor negro, in the hideous car of Indian Juggernaut, can you find a monster whose worship is polluted by such enormity as this English one of money!
Yea also, because he transgresseth by wine, he is a proud man, neither keepeth at home, who enlargeth his desire as hell, and is as death, and cannot be satisfied, but gathereth unto him all nations, and heapeth unto him all people: Shall not all these take up a parable against him, and a taunting proverb against him, and say, Woe to him that increaseth that which is not his! how long? and to him that ladeth himself with thick clay! Shall they not rise up suddenly that shall bite thee, and awake that shall vex thee, and thou shalt be for booties unto them? Because thou hast spoiled many nations, all the remnant of the people shall spoil thee; because of men's blood, and for the violence of the land, of the city, and of all that dwell therein.
A couple, a man and a woman — poor human beings almost always go in pairs — approached, and passed. I saw the empty space between them. In life's tragedy, separation is the only thing one sees. They had been happy, and they were no longer happy. They were almost old already. He did not care for her, although they were growing old together. What were they saying? In a moment of open-heartedness, trusting to the peacefulness reigning between them at that time, he owned up to an old transgression, to a betrayal scrupulously and religiously hidden until then. Alas, his words brought back an irreparable agony. The past, which had gently lain dead, rose to life again for suffering. Their former happiness was destroyed. The days gone by, which they had believed happy, were made sad; and that is the woe in everything.
Then I returned, and I saw vanity under the sun. There is one alone, and there is not a second; yea, he hath neither child nor brother: yet is there no end of all his labour; neither is his eye satisfied with riches; neither saith he, For whom do I labour, and bereave my soul of good? This is also vanity, yea, it is a sore travail. Two are better than one; because they have a good reward for their labour. For if they fall, the one will lift up his fellow: but woe to him that is alone when he falleth; for he hath not another to help him up. Again, if two lie together, then they have heat: but how can one be warm alone? And if one prevail against him, two shall withstand him; and a threefold cord is not quickly broken.
Thy Godlike crime was to be kind, To render with thy precepts less The sum of human wretchedness, And strengthen Man with his own mind; But baffled as thou wert from high, Still in thy patient energy, In the endurance, and repulse Of thine impenetrable Spirit, Which Earth and Heaven could not convulse, A mighty lesson we inherit: Thou art a symbol and a sign To Mortals of their fate and force; Like thee, Man is in part divine, A troubled stream from a pure source; And Man in portions can foresee His own funereal destiny; His wretchedness, and his resistance, And his sad unallied existence: To which his Spirit may oppose Itself — and equal to all woes, And a firm will, and a deep sense, Which even in torture can decry Its own concenter'd recompense, Triumphant where it dares defy, And making Death a Victory.
The glad sons of the deliver'd earth Shall yearly raise their multitudinous voice, Hymning great Jove, the God of Liberty! Then he grew proud, yet gentle in his pride, And full of tears, which well became his youth, As showers do spring. For he was quickly moved, And joy'd to hear sad stories that we told Of what we saw on earth, of death and woe, And all the waste of time. Then would he swear That he would conquer time; that in his reign It never should be winter; he would have No pain, no growing old, no death at all. And that the pretty damsels, whom we said He must not love, for they would die and leave him, Should evermore be young and beautiful; Or, if they must go, they should come again, Like as the flowers did. Thus he used to prate, Till we almost believed him.
Miranda: If by your art, my dearest father, you have Put the wild waters in this roar, allay them. The sky, it seems, would pour down stinking pitch, But that the sea, mounting to the welkin's cheek, Dashes the fire out. O, I have suffered With those that I saw suffer! A brave vessel, Who had, no doubt, some noble creatures in her, Dash'd all to pieces! O, the cry did knock Against my very heart! Poor souls, they perish'd! Had I been any god of power, I would Have sunk the sea within the earth, or e'er It should the good ship so have swallow'd, and The fraughting souls within her. Prospero: Be collected; No more amazement; tell your piteous heart There's no harm done. Miranda: O, woe the day! Prospero: No harm. I have done nothing but in care of thee — Of thee, my dear one! thee, my daughter.
Our passing life that we have here in our sense-soul knoweth not what our Self is.Then shall we verily and clearly see and know our Lord God in fulness of joy. And therefore it behoveth needs to be that the nearer we be to our bliss, the more we shall long; and that both by nature and by grace. We may have knowing of our Self in this life by continuant help and virtue of our high Nature. In which knowing we may exercise and grow, by forwarding and speeding of mercy and grace; but we may never fully know our Self until the last point: in which point this passing life and manner of pain and woe shall have an end. And therefore it belongeth properly to us, both by nature and by grace, to long and desire with all our mights to know our Self in fulness of endless joy.
Some more in this convention came from Kentucky to Illinois (instead of going to Missouri), not only to better their conditions, but also to get away from slavery. They have said so to me, and it is understood among us Kentuckians that we don't like it one bit. Now, can we, mindful of the blessings of liberty which the early men of Illinois left to us, refuse a like privilege to the free men who seek to plant Freedom's banner on our Western outposts? Should we not stand by our neighbors who seek to better their conditions in Kansas and Nebraska? Can we as Christian men, and strong and free ourselves, wield the sledge or hold the iron which is to manacle anew an already oppressed race ? "Woe unto them," it is written, "that decree unrighteous decrees and that write grievousness which they have prescribed." Can we afford to sin any more deeply against human liberty?
Abraham Lincoln
• From the Speech Delivered Before the First Republican State Convention of Illinois, Held at Bloomington (1856); found in Speeches & Letters of Abraham Lincoln, 1809-1865 (1894), J. M. Dent & Company, p. 56.
• Also quoted by Ida Minerva Tarbell, The Life of Abraham Lincoln: Drawn from Original Sources and Containing Many Speeches, Letters, and Telegrams Hitherto Unpublished, and Illustrated with Many Reproductions from Original Paintings, Photographs, etc, Volume 4 (1902), Lincoln History Society; and by William C. Whitney; in '''The Writings of Abraham Lincoln'', v. 2' . (1905) Lapsley, Arthur Brooks, New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Abraham Lincoln" (Quotes, 1850s)
The most perplexing of Samkhya system is the problem of relation between Purusa and Prakriti. Prakriti evolves a world full of woe and desolation to raise the soul from its slumber. The unrolling of the tragedy of the world is said to be necessary for the self, which remains inactive though it sees all that is presented to it...The evolution of Prakriti implies spiritual agency. But the spiritual centers admitted by Samkhya are incapable of exerting any direct influence on Prakriti; the Samkhya says that the mere presence of Purusas excited Prakriti to activity and development. Though Purusa is not endowed with creative might, Prakriti, which produces the manifold universe, is so on account of its union with Purusa. Prakriti is blind, but with the guidance of Purusa it produces the manifold universe. The union of the two is compared to a lame man of good vision mounted on the shoulders of a blind man of sure foot.
The most perplexing of Samkhya system is the problem of relation between Purusha and Prakriti. Prakriti evolves a world full of woe and desolation to raise the soul from its slumber. The unrolling of the tragedy of the world is said to be necessary for the self, which remains inactive though it sees all that is presented to it...The evolution of Prakriti implies spiritual agency. But the spiritual centers admitted by Samkhya are incapable of exerting any direct influence on Prakriti; the Samkhya says that the mere presence of Purushas excited Prakriti to activity and development. Though Purusha is not endowed with creative might, Prakriti, which produces the manifold universe, is so on account of its union with Purusha. Prakriti is blind, but with the guidance of Purusha it produces the manifold universe. The union of the two is compared to a lame man of good vision mounted on the shoulders of a blind man of sure foot.
He, without voice and opening of lips, formed in my soul these words: Herewith is the Fiend overcome. These words said our Lord, meaning His blessed Passion as He shewed it afore. On this shewed our Lord that the Passion of Him is the overcoming of the Fiend. God shewed that the Fiend hath now the same malice that he had afore the Incarnation. And as sore he travaileth, and as continually he seeth that all souls of salvation escape him, worshipfully, by the virtue of Christ’s precious Passion. And that is his sorrow, and full evil is he ashamed: for all that God suffereth him to do turneth us to joy and him to shame and woe. And he hath as much sorrow when God giveth him leave to work, as when he worketh not: and that is for that he may never do as ill as he would: for his might is all taken into God’s hand.
I told him how we kept fewer forms between us and God; retaining, indeed, no more than, perhaps, the nature of mankind in the mass rendered necessary for due observance. I told him I could not look on flowers and tinsel, on wax- lights and embroidery, at such times and under such circumstances as should be devoted to lifting the secret vision to Him whose home is Infinity, and His being — Eternity. That when I thought of sin and sorrow, of earthly corruption, mortal depravity, weighty temporal woe — I could not care for chanting priests or mumming officials; that when the pains of existence and the terrors of dissolution pressed before me — when the mighty hope and measureless doubt of the future arose in view — _then_, even the scientific strain, or the prayer in a language learned and dead, harassed: with hindrance a heart which only longed to cry — "God be merciful to me, a sinner!"
We have had here within these few days some serious scenes, at which I am not surprised, because I foresaw not only a struggle between the two corps, which the constitution had organized, viz. the executive (so called) and the legislative. But I was convinced that the latter would get the better. Such is the natural, and indeed the necessary order of things. It is nevertheless a painful reflection, that one of the finest countries in the world should be so cruelly torn to pieces. The storrn which lately raged is a little subsided, but the winds must soon arise again, and perhaps from the same, perhaps from another quarter. But that is of but little consequence, since in every case we must expect a little rage and devastation. A man, attached to his fellow men, must see with the same distress the woes they suffer, whether arising from an army or from a mob, and whether those by whom they are inflicted speak French or German.
Are you a man? Then you should have an human heart. But have you indeed? What is your heart made of? Is there no such principle as Compassion there? Do you never feel another's pain? Have you no Sympathy? No sense of human woe? No pity for the miserable? When you saw the flowing eyes, the heaving breasts, or the bleeding sides and tortured limbs of your fellow-creatures, was you a stone, or a brute? Did you look upon them with the eyes of a tiger? When you squeezed the agonizing creatures down in the ship, or when you threw their poor mangled remains into the sea, had you no relenting? Did not one tear drop from your eye, one sigh escape from your breast? Do you feel no relenting now? If you do not, you must go on, till the measure of your iniquities is full. Then will the Great GOD deal with You, as you have dealt with them, and require all their blood at your hands.
Thus saw I that God is our very Peace, and He is our sure Keeper when we are ourselves in unpeace, and He continually worketh to bring us into endless peace. And thus when we, by the working of mercy and grace, be made meek and mild, we are fully safe; suddenly is the soul oned to God when it is truly peaced in itself: for in Him is found no wrath. And thus I saw when we are all in peace and in love, we find no contrariness, nor no manner of letting through that contrariness which is now in us; our Lord of His Goodness maketh it to us full profitable. For that contrariness is cause of our tribulations and all our woe, and our Lord Jesus taketh them and sendeth them up to Heaven, and there are they made more sweet and delectable than heart may think or tongue may tell. And when we come thither we shall find them ready, all turned into very fair and endless worships.
Dat is het moeilijke in deze tijd: idealen, dromen, mooie verwachtingen komen nog niet bij ons op of ze worden door de gruwelijke werkelijkheid getroffen en zo totaal verwoest. Het is een groot wonder, dat ik niet al mijn verwachtingen heb opgegeven, want ze lijken absurd en onuitvoerbaar. Toch houd ik ze vast, ondanks alles, omdat ik nog steeds aan de innerlijke goedheid van den mens geloof. Het is me ten enenmale onmogelijk alles op te bouwen op de basis van dood, ellende en verwarring. Ik zie hoe de wereld langzaam steeds meer in een woestijn herschapen wordt, ik hoor steeds harder de aanrollende donder, die ook ons zal doden, ik voel het leed van millioenen mensen mee en toch, als ik naar de hemel kijk, denk ik, dat alles zich weer ten goede zal wenden, dat ook deze hardheid zal ophouden, dat er weer rust en vrede in de wereldorde zal komen. Intussen moet ik mijn denkbeelden hoog en droog houden, in de tijden die komen zijn ze misschien toch nog uit te voeren.
Anne Frank
• It's difficult in times like these: ideals, dreams and cherished hopes rise within us, only to be crushed by grim reality. It's a wonder I haven't abandoned all my ideals, they seem so absurd and impractical. Yet I cling to them because I still believe, in spite of everything, that people are truly good at heart. It's utterly impossible for me to build my life on a foundation of chaos, suffering and death. I see the world being slowly transformed into a wilderness, I hear the approaching thunder that, one day, will destroy us too, I feel the suffering of millions. And yet, when I look up at the sky, I somehow feel that everything will change for the better, that this cruelty too shall end, that peace and tranquility will return once more. In the meantime, I must hold on to my ideals. Perhaps the day will come when I'll be able to realize them!
• 15 July 1944; Variant translations:
It's really a wonder that I haven't dropped all my ideals, because they seem so absurd and impossible to carry out. Yet I keep them, because in spite of everything I still believe that people are really good at heart.
• I keep my ideals, because in spite of everything I still believe that people are really good at heart.
• I simply can't build my hopes on a foundation of confusion, misery, and death...and yet...I think...this cruelty will end, and that peace and tranquility will return again.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Anne Frank" (The Diary of a Young Girl: Composed from her 13th birthday on 12 June 1942, until 1 August 1944, just prior to her family's capture.)
If the trade is at present carried on to the same extent and nearly in the same manner, while we are delaying from year to year to put a stop to our part in it, the blood of many thousands of our helpless, much injured fellow creatures is crying against us. The pitiable state of the survivors who are torn from their relatives, connections, and their native land must be taken into account. I fear the African trade is a national sin, for the enormities which accompany it are now generally known; and though, perhaps, the greater part of the nation would be pleased if it were suppressed, yet, as it does not immediately affect their own interest, they are passive. {...] Can we wonder that the calamities of the present war begin to be felt at home, when we ourselves wilfully and deliberately inflict much greater calamities upon the native Africans, who never offended us?. "Woe unto thee that spoilest, and thou wast not spoiled when thou shalt cease to spoil, thou shalt be spoiled.
Slavery
• John Newton (1797), former slave-trader who later became an abolitionist. . Alluding to the biblical verse in Isaiah 33:1. As quoted in The Works of the Rev. John Newton... to which are Prefixed Memoirs of His Life (1839), Vol. 2, U. Hunt., page 438
• Source: Wikiquote: "Slavery" (Quotes: [[File:Legree.png|thumb|right|Slavery is an unnatural state of opression on the one side, and of suffering on the other; and needs only to be laid open or exposed in its native colours, to command the abhorrence and opposition of every man of feeling and sentiment. ~ Rev. James Ramsay ]])
At Posada, Calugareni, on the Olt, jiu and.Cerna rivers, at Turda; in the mountains of the unhappy and forgotten Moti of Vidra, all the way to Huedin and Alba-Iulia (the torture place of Horia and his brothers-in-arms), there are everywhere testimonies of battles and tombs of heroes. All over the Carpathians, from the Oltenian mountains at Dragoslavele and at Predeal, from Oituz to Vatra Dornei, on peaks and in valley bottoms, everywhere Romanian blood flowed like rivers. In the middle of the night, in difficult times for our people, we hear the call of the Romanian soil urging us to battle. I ask and I expect an answer: By what right do the Jews wish to take this land from us? On what historical argument do they base their pretensions and particularly the audacity with which they defy us Romanians, here in our own land? We are bound to this land by millions of tombs and millions of unseen threads that only our soul feels, and woe to those who shall try to snatch us from it.
And there was war in heaven: Michael and his angels fought against the dragon; and the dragon fought and his angels, And prevailed not; neither was their place found any more in heaven. And the great dragon was cast out, that old serpent, called the Devil, and Satan, which deceiveth the whole world: he was cast out into the earth, and his angels were cast out with him. And I heard a loud voice saying in heaven, Now is come salvation, and strength, and the kingdom of our God, and the power of his Christ: for the accuser of our brethren is cast down, which accused them before our God day and night. And they overcame him by the blood of the Lamb, and by the word of their testimony; and they loved not their lives unto the death. Therefore rejoice, ye heavens, and ye that dwell in them. Woe to the inhabiters of the earth and of the sea! for the devil is come down unto you, having great wrath, because he knoweth that he hath but a short time.
Prudence! Prudence which is ever bidding us look forward into the future, a future which in many cases we shall never reach; here is the real source of all our troubles! How mad it is for so short-lived a creature as man to look forward into a future to which he rarely attains, while he neglects the present which is his? This madness is all the more fatal since it increases with years, and the old, always timid, prudent, and miserly, prefer to do without necessaries to-day that they may have luxuries at a hundred. Thus we grasp everything, we cling to everything; we are anxious about time, place, people, things, all that is and will be; we ourselves are but the least part of ourselves. We spread ourselves, so to speak, over the whole world, and all this vast expanse becomes sensitive. No wonder our woes increase when we may be wounded on every side. How many princes make themselves miserable for the loss of lands they never saw, and how many merchants lament in Paris over some misfortune in the Indies!
He who doeth good unto Me, it is as if he doeth good unto God, His angels and the entire company of His loved ones. He who doeth evil unto Me, it is as if he doeth evil unto God and His chosen ones. Nay, too exalted is the station of God and of His loved ones for any person’s good or evil deed to reach their holy threshold. Whatever reacheth Me is ordained to reach Me; and that which hath come unto Me, to him who giveth will it revert. By the One in Whose hand is My soul, he hath cast no one but himself into prison. For assuredly whatsoever God hath decreed for Me shall come to pass and naught else save that which God hath ordained for us shall ever touch us. Woe betide him from whose hands floweth evil, and blessed the man from whose hands floweth good. Unto no one do I take My plaint save to God; for He is the best of judges. Every state of adversity or bliss is from Him alone, and He is the All-Powerful, the Almighty.
It has been the hope of every patriot that a sense of justice and of respect for the law would work a gradual cure of these flagrant evils. Surely no one supposes that the present can be accepted as a permanent condition. If it is said that these communities must work out this problem for themselves, we have a right to ask whether they are at work upon it. Do they suggest any solution? When and under what conditions is the black man to have a free ballot? When is he in fact to have those full civil rights which have so long been his in law? When is that equality of influence which our form of government was intended to secure to the electors to be restored? This generation should courageously face these grave questions, and not leave them as a heritage of woe to the next. The consultation should proceed with candor, calmness, and great patience, upon the lines of justice and humanity, not of prejudice and cruelty. No question in our country can be at rest except upon the firm base of justice and of the law.
I saw two persons in bodily likeness: that is to say, a Lord and a Servant; and therewith God gave me spiritual understanding. The Lord sitteth stately in rest and in peace; the Servant standeth by afore his Lord reverently, ready to do his Lord’s will. The Lord looketh upon his Servant full lovingly and sweetly, and meekly he sendeth him to a certain place to do his will. The Servant not only he goeth, but suddenly he starteth, and runneth in great haste, for love to do his Lord’s will. And anon he falleth into a slade, and taketh full great hurt. And then he groaneth and moaneth and waileth and struggleth, but he neither may rise nor help himself by no manner of way. And of all this the most mischief that I saw him in, was failing of comfort: for he could not turn his face to look upon his loving Lord, which was to him full near, — in Whom is full comfort; — but as a man that was feeble and unwise for the time, he turned his mind to his feeling and endured in woe.
The Almighty has his own purposes. 'Woe unto the world because of offenses! for it must needs be that offenses come; but woe to that man by whom the offense cometh.' If we shall suppose that American Slavery is one of those offences which, in the providence of God, must needs come, but which, having continued through His appointed time, He now wills to remove, and that He gives to both North and South, this terrible war, as the woe due to those by whom the offence came, shall we discern therein any departure from those divine attributes which the believers in a Living God always ascribe to Him? Fondly do we hope—fervently do we pray—that this mighty scourge of war may speedily pass away. Yet, if God wills that it continue until all the wealth piled by the bondman's two hundred and fifty years of unrequited toil shall be sunk, and until every drop of blood drawn with the lash shall be paid by another drawn with the sword, as was said three thousand years ago, so still it must be said, 'The judgments of the Lord are true and righteous altogether.'.
Milton, perhaps to relieve the uniformity of English structure, which tends to become too barely evident in blank verse, tries often to imitate the classical order; but the result is an effect often of artificiality, at best of solemnity. Homer's Μῆνιν ἄειδε, θεὰ, Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆος Οὐλομένην, and Virgil's 'Arma virumque cano, Trojæ qui primus ab oris,' &c., put the right words in the right place, without any loss of spirit. Milton's opening—    Of man's first disobedience, and the fruit    Of that forbidden tree, whose mortal taste    Brought death into the world, and all our woe, &c. is like an organ prelude: no English writer of a secular epic in blank verse could begin thus with success. It is impossible not to feel how tense must have been the struggle of that toil which Milton had to bestow on the stubborn material of his native language, before the gold of his words and verses won its full refinement. Diction so magnificent yet so severe cannot carry the reader along; so far from being the mere slave of the thought, like Homer's Greek, it is itself a marvel of study and meditation, which arrests and amazes him.
Afore this time I had great longing and desire of God’s gift to be delivered of this world and of this life. For oftentimes I beheld the woe that is here, and the weal and the bliss that is being there: (and if there had been no pain in this life but the absence of our Lord, methought it was some-time more than I might bear ;) and this made me to mourn, and eagerly to long. And also from mine own wretchedness, sloth, and weakness, me liked not to live and to travail, as me fell to do. And to all this our courteous Lord answered for comfort and patience, and said these words: Suddenly thou shalt be taken from all thy pain, from all thy sickness, from all thy distress and from all thy woe. And thou shalt come up above and thou shalt have me to thy meed, and thou shalt be fulfilled of love and of bliss. And thou shalt never have no manner of pain, no manner of misliking, no wanting of will; but ever joy and bliss without end. What should it then aggrieve thee to suffer awhile, seeing that it is my will and my worship?
This princess seems to combine every kind of ambition in her person. Everything that may add luster to her reign will have some attraction for her. Science and the arts will be encouraged to flourish in the empire, projects useful for the domestic economy will be undertaken. She will endeavor to reform the administration of justice and to invigorate the laws; but her policies will be based on Machiavellianism; and I should not be surprised if in this field she rivals the king of Prussia. She will adopt the prejudices of her entourage regarding the superiority of her power and will endeavor to win respect not by the sincerity and probity of her actions but also by an ostentatious display of her strength. Haughty as she is, she will stubbornly pursue her undertakings and will rarely retrace a false step. Cunning and falsity appear to be vices in her character; woe to him who puts too much trust in her. Love affairs may become a stumbling block to her ambition and prove fatal for her peace of mind. This passionate princess, still held in check by the fear and consciousness of internal troubles, will know no restraint once she believes herself firmly established.
To the mind of superficial men the future of different races has already brought disaster and ruin upon the country. The poor negro has been charged with all our woes. In the haste of these men they forget that our trouble was not ethnological, but moral, that it was not difference of complexion, but difference of conviction. It was not the Ethiopian as a man, but the Ethiopian as a slave and a coveted article of merchandise, that gave us trouble. I close these remarks as I began. If our action shall be in accordance with the principles of justice, liberty, and perfect human equality, no eloquence can adequately portray the greatness and grandeur of the future of the republic. We shall spread the network of our science and our civilization over all who seek their shelter, whether from Asia, Africa, or the isles of the sea. We shall mold them all, each after his kind, into Americans. Indian and Celt, Negro and Saxon, Latin and Teuton, Mongolian and Caucasian, Jew and gentile, all shall here bow to the same law, speak the same language, support the same government, enjoy the same liberty, vibrate with the same national enthusiasm, and seek the same national ends.
I said last year that Israel was entering into the most dangerous periods of its entire existence as a nation. That is intensifying this year with the loss of Sharon. … I think we need to look at the Bible and the Book of Joel. The prophet Joel makes it very clear that God has enmity against those who 'divide my land.' God considers this land to be His. You read the Bible and He says 'this is my land' and for any Prime Minister of Israel who decides he is going to carve it up and give it away, God says 'no, this is mine.' I had a wonderful meeting with Yitzhak Rabin in 1974. He was tragically assassinated, it was a terrible thing that happened but nevertheless he was dead. And now Ariel Sharon who again was a very likeable person, a delightful person to be with, I prayed with him personally, but here he's at the point of death. He was dividing God's land and I would say woe unto any Prime Minister of Israel who takes a similar course to appease the EU, the United Nations, or the United States of America. God says 'this land belongs to me. You'd better leave it alone.'
''''All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players: They have their exits and their entrances; And one man in his time plays many parts, His acts being seven ages. At first the infant, Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms: And then the whining school-boy, with his satchel And shining morning face, creeping like snail Unwillingly to school. And then the lover, Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad Made to his mistress’ eyebrow. Then a soldier, Full of strange oaths, and bearded like the pard; Jealous in honour, sudden, and quick in quarrel, Seeking the bubble reputation Even in the cannon’s mouth. And then the justice, In fair round belly with good capon lin'd, With eyes severe and beard of formal cut, Full of wise saws and modern instances; And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts Into the lean and slipper’d pantaloon, With spectacles on nose and pouch on side; His youthful hose, well sav'd, a world too wide For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice, Turning again toward childish treble, pipes And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all, That ends this strange eventful history, Is second childishness, and mere oblivion, Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.'''
All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players: They have their exits and their entrances; And one man in his time plays many parts, His acts being seven ages. At first the infant, Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms. And then the whining school-boy, with his satchel And shining morning face, creeping like snail Unwillingly to school. And then the lover, Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier, Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard, Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel, Seeking the bubble reputation Even in the cannon's mouth. And then the justice, In fair round belly with good capon lined, With eyes severe and beard of formal cut, Full of wise saws and modern instances; And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts Into the lean and slipper'd pantaloon, With spectacles on nose and pouch on side, His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice, Turning again toward childish treble, pipes And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all, That ends this strange eventful history, Is second childishness and mere oblivion, Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans every thing.
Age
• William Shakespeare, As You Like It (c.1599-1600), Act II, scene 7, line 139. Same idea in Jean de Courcy—Le Chemin de Vaillance. Copy in British Museum, King's MSS. No. 14. E, II. See also Horace—Ars Poetica. 158. (Ages given as four). In the Mishna, the ages are given as 14, by Jehuda, son of Thema. In Plato's (spurious) Dialog. Axiochus, Socrates sums up human life.
• Source: Wikiquote: "Age" (Sourced, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations: Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 12-17.)
Now the brother shall betray the brother to death, and the father the son; and children shall rise up against their parents, and shall cause them to be put to death.And ye shall be hated of all men for my name's sake: but he that shall endure unto the end, the same shall be saved. But when ye shall see the abomination of desolation, spoken of by Daniel the prophet, standing where it ought not, (let him that readeth understand,) then let them that be in Judaea flee to the mountains: And let him that is on the housetop not go down into the house, neither enter therein, to take any thing out of his house: And let him that is in the field not turn back again for to take up his garment. But woe to them that are with child, and to them that give suck in those days! And pray ye that your flight be not in the winter. For in those days shall be affliction, such as was not from the beginning of the creation which God created unto this time, neither shall be. And except that the Lord had shortened those days, no flesh should be saved: but for the elect's sake, whom he hath chosen, he hath shortened the days.