HEBREWS 12:28

KING JAMES VERSION (KJV)

TRANSLATION, MEANING, CONTEXT

To get what Hebrews 12:28 means based on its source text, scroll down or follow these links for the original scriptural meaning , biblical context and relative popularity.

“Wherefore we receiving a kingdom which cannot be moved, let us have grace, whereby we may serve God acceptably with reverence and godly fear:”

High popularity: 720 searches a month
Popularity relative to other verses in Hebrews chapter 12 using average monthly Google searches.

Hebrews 12:28 Translation & Meaning

What does this verse really mean? Use this table to get a word-for-word translation of the original Greek Scripture. This shows the English words related to the source biblical texts along with brief definitions. Follow the buttons in the right-hand column for detailed definitions and verses that use the same root words. Use this reference information to gain deeper insight into the Bible and enrich your understanding. Information based on Strong's Exhaustive Concordance[1].

KJV Verse Original Greek Meaning/ Definition
This is a simplified translation of the original Greek word. Follow the buttons on the right to get more detail.
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Use the buttons below to get details on the Greek word and view related Bible verses that use the same root word.
Wherefore Διὸ Through which thing, i.e., consequently Wherefore
we receiving παραλαμβάνοντες To receive near, i.e., associate with oneself (in any familiar or intimate act or relation); by analogy, to assume an office; figuratively, to learn receiving
a kingdom βασιλείαν Properly, royalty, i.e., (abstractly) rule, or (concretely) a realm (literally or figuratively) kingdom
which cannot be moved, ἀσάλευτον Unshaken, i.e., (by implication) immovable (figuratively) cannot moved
let us have ἔχωμεν To hold (used in very various applications, literally or figuratively, direct or remote; such as possession; ability, contiuity, relation, or condition) let
grace, χάριν Graciousness (as gratifying), of manner or act (abstract or concrete; literal, figurative or spiritual; especially the divine influence upon the heart, and its reflection in the life; including gratitude) grace
whereby δι' Through (in very wide applications, local, causal, or occasional) whereby
we may serve λατρεύωμεν To minister (to God), i.e., render religious homage serve
God θεῷ A deity, especially (with G3588) the supreme Divinity; figuratively, a magistrate; exceedingly (by Hebraism) God
acceptably εὐαρέστως Quite agreeably acceptably
with μετὰ Properly, denoting accompaniment; "amid" (local or causal); modified variously according to the case (genitive association, or accusative succession) with which it is joined; occupying an intermediate position between G0575 or G1537 and G1519 or G4314; less intimate than G1722 and less close than G4862) with
reverence αἰδοῦς Bashfulness, i.e., (towards men), modesty or (towards God) awe reverence
and καὶ And, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words and
godly fear: εὐλαβείας Properly, caution, i.e., (religiously) reverence (piety); by implication, dread (concretely) godly fear

Verse Context

See Hebrews 12:28 with its adjacent verses in bold below. Follow either of the two large buttons below to see these verses in their broader context of the King James Bible or a Bible concordance.

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  • 26  Whose voice then shook the earth: but now he hath promised, saying, Yet once more I shake not the earth only, but also heaven.

  • 27  And this word, Yet once more, signifieth the removing of those things that are shaken, as of things that are made, that those things which cannot be shaken may remain.

  • 28  Wherefore we receiving a kingdom which cannot be moved, let us have grace, whereby we may serve God acceptably with reverence and godly fear:

  • 29  For our God is a consuming fire.




Sources:

The King James Bible (1611) and Strong's Concordance (1890) with Hebrew and Greek dictionaries are sourced from the BibleForgeDB database (https://github.com/bibleforge) within the BibleForge project (http://bibleforge.com). Popularity rankings are based on search volume data from the Google AdWords Keyword Planner tool.


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